Survival

The Size of Your Ferro Rod Matters – Go Big!

by Todd Walker

ferro rod size matters

I once held the opinion that the size of your ferro rod didn’t really matter. As long as your little rod throws enough sparks to ignite a tinder bundle or char cloth, that’s all you need, right?

For the record, I’ve started many fires with thin $5 ferrocerium rods. No survival kit is complete without this essential fire starter. I bet Tom Hanks’ character (Chuck) wished he had one in his pocket in the movie Cast Away. But then again, he would never have experienced the thrill of fire by friction.

Ain’t Hollywood great!

Seriously, life and death situations are not the time to trust primal fire-making methods. These techniques are great skills to develop, but don’t play around with combustion when fire could save your life. Always carry fire redundancy.

The Size of Your Ferro Rod Matters - Go Big!

Pocket dump… this pocket-sized ferro rod and hacksaw blade striker rides on my key ring.

If all you can afford is a $5 ferro rod, buy it and learn to use it. Keep in mind that these are a consumable item and will eventually be depleted with use.

That’s why size matters!

Making fire is a hot topic with many arm-chair warriors on the internet. Some argue for small, light-weight rods to get the job done. I carry a small ferro rod everyday for those just-in-case times. A Bic lighter too. But for long-term survivability, I’m fond of big, substantial, molten steel for spontaneous combustion.

It’s been said that the key to lasting success is… lasting. The same applies to your survival gear. In the combustion department, you want a ferro rod that will last through years of use.

Allow me to introduce you to my new “little” friend!

The Size of Your Ferro Rod Matters - Go Big!

Measuring 1/2″ x 6″, this is a pyro beast!

Last weekend I spent some dirt time testing this fire wand. The amount of 3,000º sparks raining down from this fire tool is insane!

I ordered mine from the Pathfinder Store. No fancy bone or wood handles. Just a blank ferro rod.

My down and dirty handle is made of several feet of Gorilla Tape and a loop of paracord. Here’s my reasoning for this handle:

  • Extra Gorilla Tape is never a bad thing in a crisis
  • Epoxied handles tend to come loose with heavy use over time – not so with this tape
  • The loop allows me to clip the rod on the inside of my bushcraft bag or B.O.B.
  • My pinky finger fits inside to secure the grip when pulling the rod across the spine of your knife or metal striker

The One-Strike Fire

The importance of fire for wilderness survival can’t be overstated. If you only have once chance to make fire, this ferro rod increase your odds.

Use a knife with a 90º spine or other sharp object to remove the black coating from the rod. The coating is there to prevent oxidation. Note to self: Do not test this bad boy inside your house or over your feet. Trust me on this one. These globs of molten metal burn for a couple of seconds once they hit the ground.

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No amount of sparks will start a fire without properly processed tinder. Here I’m working natural tinder (cedar bark) into a fine fiber. Just to the left of my hands is a hat full of Beech leaves. Foliage from Beech trees is hanging around (late March) just asking to help make fire.

DSCN0474

Get the angle right with your scraper on the ferro rod and pull the rod back across the spin. My closed Opinel #8 worked fine. You want a high carbon steel blade for this task. The high carbon part isn’t as important with ferro rods but comes into play when using flint and steel to make sparks.

[High carbon steel is pyrophoric. Pyrophoric materials are substances that ignite instantly upon exposure to oxygen. We'll discuss the science behind flint and steel in an upcoming post.]

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The increased surface area of my new pyro wand produced fire in my tinder bundle with only one strike. What if you only get one strike to make fire? Bring a big bat to the plate!

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In an emergency scenario where fire determines your survivability, rescue, life or death… SIZE MATTERS! Once you go big, you’ll never go back.

Update: For those interested, below is a progress photo of my semi-permanent bushcraft shelter. We all need a place to practice our Doing the Stuff skills… a place to trade theory for action!

DSCN0480

 

Keep Doing the Stuff,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook pageReady to trade theory for action? Join us in the Doing the Stuff Network on these social media sites: PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook. Use the hashtag #DoingTheStuff when sharing your stuff on Twitter.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, DRG and I would appreciate your vote on the Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding Prepper sites while you’re there…

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

 

 

Categories: Bushcraft, Camping, Doing the Stuff, Gear, Preparedness, Survival | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

A Bomb Proof Mod for the Pathfinder Bottle Cook Kit

by Todd Walker

I love my Pathfinder 32 oz. Bottle Cooking Kit… except for one thing… the bag.

A Bomb Proof Mod for the Pathfinder Bottle Cook Kit

The bag is such a useful piece of kit and I hated its one glitch.

The nesting cup caught on the interior of the nylon bag when storing or removing the set. I filed the bat-wing handle attachment but the cup still snagged the bag liner. Oh well, I thought I’d have to live with it. 

Christian C rescued my bag by making a simple, yet brilliant, modification on his YouTube channel which saved me the gnawing frustration each time I used my cup in the field. You can check his video out at the bottom of this post. 

As many of you know, I’m a container freak! And this mod not only fixes the bag snag but also adds yet another metal container to my cook kit. I’m a redundancy freak too. 

All you need is a #3 Tall can from the grocery store. I stopped by our mom and pop grocery store on my way back from some quality dirt time yesterday and bought the cheapest can of tomato juice on the shelf. I walked in with my tape measure to make sure the can would fit my PF bag. 

The can’s dimensions are 4 1/4 inches in diameter by 7 inches tall and holds about 45 oz. I paid $1.55. 

Remove the lid with a can opener and discard the juice… or drink it if you’re into cheap, watered down fruit juice. Check the rim for any sharp edges. File them smooth if you have any. Mine had none. 

Wash and dry the can. Drill two holes on opposite sides of the top rim of the can. File the holes smooth. Make the holes large enough to accept the fish mouth spreader (bottle hanger) that comes with your PF Complete Bottle Cooking Kit

A Bomb Proof Mod for the Pathfinder Bottle Cook Kit

A Bomb Proof Mod for the Pathfinder Bottle Cook Kit

Bottle hanger attached to my new container

Insert the can into the bag. It’s a tight fit but will slide in creating a nesting sleeve for the cup, 32 oz. bottle, and pack stove ring. 

A Bomb Proof Mod for the Pathfinder Bottle Cook Kit

27 oz cup nesting inside the 45 oz can

A Bomb Proof Mod for the Pathfinder Bottle Cook Kit

A Bomb Proof Mod for the Pathfinder Bottle Cook Kit

Perfect fit!

Disclaimer: As you know, I don’t advertise on our site. I receive no compensation for any of the stuff I promote on our blog unless it passes the Doing the Stuff test. If you’re interested in ordering this kit, you can do so by clicking here: PF Complete Bottle Cooking Kit. The newer model comes with a strainer lid for the cup, an item I’m ordering soon. 

You never want to be caught without a way to stay hydrated or make fire to regulate your core temperature. That’s why I carry this bomb proof kit with me on all my adventures in the wild – day hikes, camping, dirt time, hunting, and fishing.

I can’t thank Christian C enough for his brilliant idea! Watch his video below…

<iframe width=”640″ height=”390″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/rC0zJcKWpbg” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen>

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd 

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook pageReady to trade theory for action? Join us in the Doing the Stuff Network on these social media sites: PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook. Use the hashtag #DoingTheStuff when sharing your stuff on Twitter.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, DRG and I would appreciate your vote on the Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding Prepper sites while you’re there…

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Bushcraft, Camping, Doing the Stuff, Gear, Self-reliance, Survival | Tags: , | 3 Comments

Surviving School Shootings with Weapons of Mass Instruction

by Todd Walker

“Shooter in the building! Lockdown! Lockdown!”

The resource officer is dying on the lobby floor. With the only other human in the building with a gun bleeding out, the shooting spree continues, unabated. The shooter, clad with body armor, deliberately makes his way down the main hallway firing his weapon at unarmed targets.

He approaches the locked door of your child’s classroom…

“Quite,” her teacher barely whispers to her class huddled in the corner.

Imagine this scene playing out in your child’s school or your office building. We don’t like to think about the possibility of such a horrible event. But we have to. It’s the world in which we live.

It’s quite possible you, a family member, or a friend work in a Weapon Free Zone. It’s highly unlikely that teachers, properly trained to use a firearm, will ever be allowed to carry this tool to protect innocent lives. So we are forced to use what’s available.

I work in the epitome of victim zones. A place where hoplophobia is instilled in young minds by our ever-expanding zero-tolerance regime. The inconvenient truth about these “evil” tools is not lost on many of my fellow teachers. They too value their life and the lives of their students and refuse to be a victim, cowering under desks, hoping and praying the good guys with guns show up before an active shooter sprays bullets across bulletin boards.

We plan to fight back, smarter.

Denial ain’t just a river in Egypt

Our present shooting-fish-in-a-barrel strategy is deadly… and should be abandoned. Immediately!

Signs of hope do exist in the rational thinker realm. My hint is located a few paragraphs above. In mass shootings, defenseless prey, stripped of modern weaponry in No-Weapon-Zones, frantically wait for officials (even a non-official would suffice) with guns to stop the violence.

In my earlier Teacher Self-defense Toolbox post, I made the case for creating a non-victim zone – if you’re one of the fish in the barrel like me. The comments from that post and another brilliant source I follow spurred me to update my school survival strategy.

Disclaimer: Some school systems and employers are more hoplophobic than others. Even chewing a slice of pizza into the shape of a gun could land you in deep-dish doo doo. Employ your work place survival strategy at your own risk. This is what I do – not necessarily what you should do. Think for yourself and find ways to camouflage (hide in plain sight) your tools of self-defense if necessary. Any step you take is better than waiting for “good” guns to rescue you. Don’t be a victim!

An Armed Teacher’s Toolbox

Armed with only weapons of mass instruction, my MacGyver gene expression is on full tilt. To justify self-defense tools in the classroom or office to higher-ups, you’re improvised weapons should fit your environment.

Surviving School Shootings with Weapons of Mass Instruction

Not your typical teacher toolbox

Take a tour with me through my classroom and steal ideas. Start at the gateway…

The Door

The gateway for an active shooter is your door. In our school, solid wood classroom doors swing inward. My door is always locked. This new county-wide policy took effect after the Sandy Hook. I’ve followed this protocol for years.

Locks don’t always stop shooters. To beef up my door security, I cut wooden door wedges from scrap 2 x 4 lumber. [Note: Cut with the grain or length wise. Cutting short wedges across the grain will cause the wedge to splinter when hammered under the door.] I’ve made these available to all teachers and staff.

In lockdown mode, drive two or three wedges under the door from inside the classroom. Do this with one of your other tools, a hammer. A rubberized bottom will ensure friction on our tiled floors.

Door Plan B, which my students and I have tested, is to build a barricade extending from the door to the back wall. This consists of two teacher’s desks, a computer cart, a door I converted into a table, and one book shelf. The assembled furniture creates a solid barrier from door to wall.

Hat tip to Straight Forward in a Crooked World for the following tip. I’ve finally found a good use for vegetable oil. The only person on the tiled hallways of our school will be the shooter. Before locking my door, I plan to remove the lid from a plastic cooking oil container and give it a stomp spewing its contents over the tile.

Surviving School Shootings with Weapons of Mass Instruction

Left over from four years ago when I stopped using veggie oil. Repurposed now!

Add a bag of kitty litter and a scoop to your cabinet in case you and your students need to get out of the room over the oil spill. Or a rolled up rug could be unrolled over the slippery stuff.

Eye for an eye

If my door is breached, I have a fire extinguisher ready to blind the intruder.

Surviving School Shootings with Weapons of Mass Instruction

Blinding chemical cocktail

Also, Vikki suggested a can of wasp spray on my last toolbox post. The insect killer shoots over 20 feet. Bear spray and pepper spray are not allowed in our schools. Wasp spray is in my desk drawer.

Smit thy enemy

Temporarily blind the threat and begin your assault. First order of business is to disarm and disable the shooter. 

You need striking tools. Here’s a few of mine…

1.) Jawbone of an ass

Samson, of Biblical fame, smote 1,000 Philistines with this improvised weaponry. Comes in handy for Science too.

Surviving School Shootings with Weapons of Mass Instruction

Get smitten!

2.) Annihilator™ wrecking tool

 

Image source

Any metal tool or bar can be used as a striking tool. I’ve opened stuck lockers and hammered stuff with this beast. A blow from this to the hand or head would cause great damage.

Some have suggested a golf club. In my experience as a “golfer”, the shafts are not solid enough to deliver repeated strikes to an intruder. A rebar shaft would be though.

3.) Hoe handle. Pictured above with the spade removed. Self explanatory.

A baseball bat (aluminum or wooden) works. You could display it on your office wall as the bat that won your State Championship. You’re limited only by your imagination (and nanny statism).

Until I’m able to legally carry real defensive weapons on campus, I’ll keep MacGyvering weapons of mass instruction. If you have thoughts you’d like to add, please do so in the comment section.

Keep Doing the Stuff,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook page. The Doing the Stuff Network community can be found here: PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook. Check out the good stuff and trade theory for ACTION!

P.P.S ~ If you find value in our blog, DRG and I would appreciate your vote on the “Top Prepper Sites“! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding Prepper Sites while you’re there.

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: 180 Mind Set Training, Self Defense, Survival | Tags: , , | 15 Comments

4 Monolithic Myths About Bug Out Bags

by Todd Walker

What nasty turn of events would warrant you grabbing your Bug Out Bag and heading for the hills… on foot if necessary? Or better yet, your well stocked retreat?

Be careful how you answer this loaded question.

There’s a long list of bug out worthy disaster scenarios according to some survival ex-perts. Some of are real experts, some well-intentioned, others are attention whores. Read the fine print and think logically.

Most on-the-run survival advice is romance rolled into a 70 lb. “tactical” sack on your back.

I’m convinced that many preppers embrace the huge BOB thesis because of its romantic appeal. What ex-perts in the preparedness community say doesn’t always harmonize with actual experience.

Here’s 4 reasons why…

Image courtesy of Mountain Goat Diaries http://mountaingoatdiaries.blogspot.com/2011/03/nepal-in-pictures.html

Image courtesy of Mountain Goat Diaries

1.) Too Much Stuff

The vast majority of hopeful bug-outers are nowhere near physically capable of carrying 3 days worth of water (8.34 lb./gal. x 3 = 25.02 lb.) for a 72 hour excursion – plus other gear. But you’ve got the water issue covered with a handy water filter and a metal container and collapsible bladders, right? Just lightened you pack considerable.

What about the other stuff? You’ve got to have ammo, guns, food, gear, clothing, first aid, shelter, and 12 unique ways to build a fire. Then there are those heavy ‘comfort’ items.

You’ll need an ATV just to get the 75 pound bag out of the yard.

Since DRG and I have BOB’s at the ready, does this make me a hypocrite for writing this?

No.

BOB’s have their place in our overall plan. The same goes for my  Get Home Bag – a totally different creature. Both are akin to having AFLAC as supplemental insurance.

You may have seen pictures of me and Dirt Road Girl training with our backpacks. They make great workout equipment. Physical training and testing and Doing the Stuff to gauge what weight we could realistically carry if we were ever forced to use feet instead of wheels.

But mostly (I mean the 99% kind of mostly), our intended purpose was to add resistance in our functional fitness program – not train to hump 100 miles to our retreat. Actually, 96 miles on nicely paved roads.

2.) Untested Stuff

Our bags are packed with gear and supplies we have tested. Weighted so we can carry them. Being un-tacti-cool, they look like something you’d see on an AT section hiker’s back. BOB’s are truly a last resort item in our prep plan.

4 Monolithic Myths About Bug Out Bags

Not very tacti-cool!

By the way, we don’t have doggie bug out bags for ‘Moose’ and ‘Abby’, our two spoiled rescue mutts. I know. I’ll hear from some of you about our lack of pet prep. But our dogs fit so nicely in the back of our bug out vehicles (BOV). Nothing special about our BOV’s. They’re just daily drivers.

3.) Child Stuff

On top of that, we don’t have small children tagging along behind us as we machete a path through briars and brambles. Small children alone are reason enough to abandon the thought of trekking through the woods to safety. It would not be safe. Or smart.

Here’s the thing.

We don’t plan on using our BOB’s for anything other than dire emergencies – like a nearby chemical spill or our neighborhood is on fire.

If we are forced by Mother Nature or man-made nastiness to leave our stocked home, we have optional safe destinations (pre-arranged) with written plans for our family on getting there. We’ll throw our BOB’s in the vehicle just in case the black top turns into a very long parking lot and forces us to abandon our wheeled transportation.

4.) They’re Potential Refugee Bags

Options are great to have. But bugging out to nowhere in particular makes you a refugee. This whole live-off-the-land theory is just that – theory. Heading to the hills to survive fosters the romance of living off the land like mountain men. Once there, you won’t be alone. Other scared Refugee BOB-ers read that same book or blog and will be joining you. Hungry. Thirsty. Desperate. Armed. And desperate. I repeat myself.

A Better Option

If things deteriorate to a point of eminent death if you stay put, by all means, get out of dodge! Be smart. Plan now to have a pre-determined, well-stocked, alternative location(s).

Don’t have the money to purchase a secluded off-grid homestead or retreat? Neither do we. Talk to relatives and friends who are willing to work out a plan to provide a safe retreat. Make the plan reciprocal, of course. [Sherpa Tip: Plan to bring more to the table than you take.] Having backup plans to your backup plans is anti-fragile prepping.

Hunkering down at your own home to weather a crisis would be better than strapping on a refugee bug out bag and heading to parts unknown. If you’ve prepped even minimally, think of what you’d be leaving behind by heading to your ‘secret’ wilderness survival spot. Especially if you have to stretch 72 hours of resources to last a week – or God forbid, forever.

  • Shelter – no power to your house is better than an extended stay in a debris hut… or a FEMA cot.
  • Food you normally eat – not 11-year-old MRE’s. There are only x amount of deer and squirrel and such scampering through the woods to feed yourself and your fellow evacuees.
  • Guns, gear, and medical supplies – rent a semi-trailer bug out vehicle maybe.
  • Normal routine and familiar people – these vanish on a wilderness bug out – just before the edible plants and animals.
  • Neighbors to help with security. You know your neighbors, right?

Know Your Stuff

Bug out bags that are carry-able by the average person should not be packed for comfort. Pack your kit for use. Use the stuff you pack. Never buy shiny objects to stow in your kit without testing and using them regularly.

4 Monolithic Myths About Bug Out Bags

DRG and ‘Abby’ testing her new hammock last summer

When your survival is on the line, unfamiliarity with your gear may cost you more than lost time.

Keep Stuff Normal

Keeping your life and surroundings as normal as possible in a crisis decreases stressors, which will be abundantly present during any emergency. Why invite another monkey to ride on your overloaded bug out bag.

We all need our version of childhood security blankets. It might be your favorite coffee mug, pillow, or your cushy sofa. This stuff may seem trivial and soft to hardened survivalists, but being separated from these ‘security blankets’ adds stress.

On a more personal note, I spent 4 months living in a homeless shelter during the Y2K non-event. My basic needs were met: I had a roof over my head, food to eat, and clothes to wear. What I missed most was my roof, my food I enjoyed at my table, and having the ability to wear clothes from my closet.

Being homeless taught me to appreciate the ‘security blanket’ of home. Normal stuff we take for granted. The stuff we use in our daily lives.

I’ll close by answering my original, loaded question. Bugging out on foot, even without small children in tow, would require a rather large load of S*** Hitting the Fan to force me and DRG to leave our home with only the stuff in our BOB’s. Not my idea of romance.

What would it take for you?

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. – DRG and I hope each of you had a Merry Christmas! Stay tuned for an exciting announcement that will help you have the most prepared new year ever!!!

P.S.S. - You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, Google +, and our Facebook page.

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Doing the Stuff, Preparedness, Survival | Tags: , , | 21 Comments

7 Tips to Keep You Alive and Found in the Wilderness

by Todd Walker

Get out there!

Spend enough time with Mother Nature and you’ll likely experience emergencies.

7 Tips to Keep You Alive and Found in the Wilderness

Things went right this trip.

Even the most innocent outings are potential survival situations. That fishing trip can turn nasty for all the wrong reasons. Your day hike may find you sleeping under the stars with a busted knee.

Always carry a minimal what-if emergency kit. With these tools, a survival mind-set, and Doing the Stuff skills, you increase your odds of staying alive and being found.

A.) Mindset Training

No matter the crisis or survival situation, your ability to come out on the other side alive is largely dependent upon your attitude. Recognizing that there will be added stress – mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual – is your first step.

Let us train our minds to desire what the situation demands. – Seneca the Younger

All your other skills will be affected by your mindset. Obviously, the more skills and knowledge you have, the more comfortable you’ll be when starting a fire to stay warm when your lost in the wilderness. Being collected enough to start a fire not only provides physical life support but boosts morale.

The more you practice skills, the more you’re attitude improves. Doing the Stuff beforehand keeps panic at bay.

B.) There’s No “I” in Team

This clever slogan adorns team t-shirts and locker room walls in the world of sport. Unfortunately, the saying won’t work on surv”I“val. There it sits, smack dab in the middle of the word!

In some cases, “I” is all you have. This scenario requires you to be a team of one – without a camera crew filming or emergency personnel standing by. You’ll have to survive on your wits and create your own ‘luck.’

C.) Resilient First Aid

Injuries happen. A scrap becomes infected. A misstep twists your ankle. Now you’ve become the doctor. All the more reason to pack a basic first aid kit. Learning basic first aid builds resilience.

The larger threat in wilderness survival situations is hypothermia and hyperthermia. Getting cold and wet leads to hypothermia. You’re ability to make sound decisions is reduced when your body’s core temp drops.

D.) Improvised Emergency Shelter

I’ve said this before, but it’s worth repeating. Mother Nature is temperamental. She likes to see how much hell you can handle while visiting her “house.”

Humans aren’t built for prolonged exposure to nature’s elements. We require shelter. We may stumble upon a cave if one is available. But one advantage we have over our furry critter friends is our ability to use logic and reason to survive.

Any crisis over a couple of hours in wet, cold conditions will likely escalate into a life-threatening setting. Shelter is more important than water in this case. Humans can only go three hours without shelter. Having experience in building emergency shelter can save your life. If you’re caught without a piece of plastic or a tarp, you’ll have to improvise and use what nature provides.

Here’s some ways to build a temporary ‘home’ in the wilderness…

E.) Fire

7 Tips to Keep You Alive and Found in the Wilderness

The fire triangle

The ability to make fire is everything in the wilderness. This skill aids in cooking, purifying, heating, signaling, security, and comfort. Fire affects all your other physical and emotional steps to survival and rescue.

Fire is life!

F.) Signaling Rescuers

This one doesn’t get much attention but may be your best hope of being found alive. A series of 3 of anything (sound or visual) let’s search and rescue know you’re in distress. Three whistle blasts, rocks, logs, and/or fires. Use fire at night and smoke during the day. Be sure not to set the surrounding forest ablaze.

If you want to be found, leave a trail or signs for search and rescue. Leave a bandana or strip of cloth hanging from branches if ground rescue is involved. Also build arrows with natural or man-made material to indicate your travel direction.

For ground-to-air rescue, find an opening or clearing and create large signals with straight lines and 90 degree angles or circles. Use logs or rocks that contrast with the background. Build a log cabin fire setup with dry tinder and fuel in the bottom and green leafy material on top that will produce lots of smoke. Fire it up when you hear airplanes or helicopters.

Number Message Code Symbol
1 Require Assistance V
2 Require Medical Assistance X
3 Proceeding in this Direction
4 Yes or Affirmative Y
5 No or Negative N

The above chart indicates to rescue how to proceed. Use any available contrasting material to make these symbols a minimum of 3 feet wide and 18 feet long to alert aircraft.

Shiny Object Signaling

A signaling mirror or any shiny object will work to alert pilots. Reflected sunlight can be seen for several miles. For more details on signaling with shiny objects, Creek Stewart shows you how to improvise here.

Always leave the 3 W’s with a trusted friend or family member:

  1. Where you’re going
  2. When you plan on returning
  3. Who’s in your group.

[I intentionally left water and food out of this post. Well, to be honest, I'm running short on time and don't have the energy to cover these in this post. :) We'll chew on these later.]

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, and our new Facebook pageThanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: 180 Mind Set Training, Bushcraft, Camping, Survival, Survival Skills | Tags: , , | 7 Comments

Next Level Travel Kit: Packing Survival Junk in Your Trunk

by Todd Walker

Wouldn’t you hate to spend two nights in 20 below temps with 4 children between the ages of 3 and 10 … in your vehicle!?

This week, a couple did just that when their car overturned in the Nevada mountains. They stayed warm by heating rocks in a fire outside their stranded vehicle and placing them inside to stay warm. The couple used what they had available to keep their family from freezing to death.

Next Level Travel Kit: Packing Survival Junk in Your Trunk

Here’s my junk in my trunk

We spend an awful lot of time in cars and trucks getting to and from work. Then there are those holiday road trips to grandma’s house. Unexpected things can happen on the road leaving you stranded or worse.

In my Everyday Carry post, I showed you what I carry daily and why. Now let’s take a look at the next level of away-from-home survival stuff – the junk in your trunk.

DRG and I don’t own vehicles with trunks. Our daily rides are SUV’s. That’s no excuse for not having basic emergency supplies stored in your ‘trunk.’

Your ride comes minimally equipped to get you home. We’ll cover these basics and add to your standard equipment list today.

Keep in mind that we’re not building a zombie apocalypse vehicle. We just trying to make it to our destination alive. Routine maintenance is more important than adding shiny zombie-slaying objects to your car or truck.

To increase your survival odds, pack this junk in your trunk:

Next Level Travel Kit: Packing Survival Junk in Your Trunk

Some of the junk in my trunk unpacked.

Maintenance and Repair

Spare tire – Sounds obvious, right? Make sure your spare is properly inflated. If you can afford it, switch that donut spare to a standard sized spare tire for your make and model. Check the air pressure regularly on all your tires, including the spare.

Tire changing equipment – You need to know where your jack and tire iron is stored in your vehicle. They put them in crazy hiding places now. I upgraded to a 4-way lug wrench for my vehicle. The standard equipped lug wrenches are too short to apply the needed pressure to break nuts free that have been installed at the tire shop with impact drivers. You don’t want to jump up and down on a 10 inch lug wrench to break a nut free. Manual or electric tire inflators are nice to include. I’ve got a foot powered pump. Throw in a tire pressure gauge in your kit.

Fix-a-Flat – This is a down and dirty way to inflate and seal a dead tire in some cases. It only buys you enough milage and time to properly repair your tire.

Jumper cables – Buy the best quality and longest booster cables you can afford. 8 and 6 gauge wire cables will set you back. I’m guessing that this item is my most used tool in my vehicle. Pack a cheap set. It’s better than nothing. I’ve got a cheap pair for my kit. DRG gets the good set.

Important phone numbers – Keep a written list in your glove box or wallet of people to help get you home in case your phone dies: towing company, insurance company, repair shop, family/real friends, AAA.

Repair manual – Roadside repairs aren’t always possible. Having a repair manual has helped me in the past. Keep one under your seat or glove box.

Tools – Unless you’ve got major motor-head skills, modern trucks and cars are built with complex systems most have no clue how to fix – including me!

Next Level Travel Kit: Packing Survival Junk in Your Trunk

My cheap, self-contained tool kit

My tool kit is bare minimum and cheap: ratchet set, screw drivers, flashlight/headlamp, pliers, hose clamps, multitool (not real useful on engines but had to add it as a prepper), adjustable wrench, and duct tape.  You’re mechanic’s phone number is more important here.

A seat belt cutter in the middle console might come in handy if your ever upside down, strapped to your seat.

Emergency signaling – Road flares and reflective triangles. Typical road flares burn for 15 minutes and can be employed to build and fire in a pinch.

Tow strap – For pulling a stuck vehicle out of the ditch.

Map - Not on your smart phone either. A hardcopy map of your area or travel route.

Next Level Survival Junk

First aid – Tape, bandages, disinfectant wipes, pain relievers, and birthing equipment to deliver babies in the emergency lane. ;)

Fire –  Lighter and tinder. Don’t forget your emergency flares for wet conditions.

Food – Healthy snacks that will satiate. In hotter climates, the challenge is to prevent spoilage. I handle this problem by carrying food items in my Get Home Bag which doesn’t stay in my vehicle- but is with me in controlled indoor temperatures at work or home.

Shaker Siphon – Ever been stranded with an empty fuel tank? This tool makes emergency refueling easy! Or you can build your own electric fuel transfer pump here.

Running on Empty: Siphoning Gas without Sucking

Just shake and it works!

Water – I pack a stainless steel water container. This allows me to purify water via boiling if ever necessary.

Ice scraper – Get creative with its use other than the original purpose.

Tissue – Small travel packs in the glove box.

Paper and pencil – If you have to abandon your vehicle, jot a quick not to Search and Rescue as to which direction you’re headed. Write a quick, updated last will and testament or note to your loved ones if it got to that point.

Rain gear – A rain coat and paints, USGI poncho, or a contractor grade trash bag works to keep rain and wind off your body.

Car phone charger -

Blanket/Sleeping bag – I pack a military wool blanket with a camp hatchet rolled inside. The bedroll has a loop of rope folded into the core that doubles as backpack straps.

Next Level Travel Kit: Packing Survival Junk in Your Trunk

Wool bedroll with axe inside

Extra clothes – In a dry bag, pack extra wool socks, polypropylene base layer, gloves, and a wool sweater. I have a pair of hiking boots in the back as well.

Tarp – This could be used for shelter if you have to abandon your vehicle. Also serves as a ground cover if you have to lay on the ground to fix something under your car. Paracord is already attached to all the eyelets on the tarp.

Ammo and extra magazines – Speaks for itself.

Get home bag – This bag accompanies me to work and gives additional resources and food.

Next Level Travel Kit: Packing Survival Junk in Your Trunk

Redundant Junk in my get home bag

Flashlight/headlamp – pack fresh batteries. I also have a new pair of LightSpecks reading glasses in the kit.

Knife – I have a spare throw-away fixed blade knife in my vehicle kit.

Since I don’t have an official ‘trunk,’ house this junk in an old backpack and large ammo can. Small compartments hold the other gear and tools. The fire extinguisher is in the pouch behind the passenger’s seat for easy access.

I’ve seen others use plastic bins and other containers for their junk. I like the backpack. It allows me to grab and go if I need to hoof it.

Without an actual trunk to conceal my kit, I use the pull over cover in the back of my vehicle to hide my junk. If you drive a truck, use a tool box on the bed and cab space to house your junk.

Hopefully you’ll never need to use all this junk in your trunk. Better to have it and not need it.

What kind of junk is in your trunk? Sound off in the comments…

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. ~ As always, if anything from this site adds value to your life, please pass it on. You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, and our new Facebook pageThanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Preparedness, Survival | Tags: , , | 16 Comments

Is This Cotton Pickin’ Killer in Your Winter B.O.B.?

by Todd Walker

Hikers and other outdoorsmen are fond of the ‘cotton kills‘ meme. Search these two words and you’ll wonder how grandpa survived frontier life without polypropylene!

An APB has been issued on this serial killer!

An APB has been issued on this serial killer!

The survival and prepping community should take note. If you’re a lover and wearer of killer cotton, the Bug Out Fashion Police won’t be summoned to whisk you off to polypro prison and re-education camp.

Dirt Road Girl and I repack our 72 hour bags for fall/winter each year. If we ever need to grab and go, we know our kits would contain synthetic, wicking base layers from head to toe. Humidity is high in our state and I sweat a lot with a 30 pound pack strapped to my back. Synthetic material against my skin does a great job at wicking moisture to outer clothing layers.

Do we pack killer cotton in our winter kits? Yes. It has its place and uses.

Killer cotton is not lethal. Choosing the wrong clothing for your situation and environment kills!

So how did this natural, comfy fiber get such a bad rap?

The Science of Staying Warm

Cotton gained the label ‘killer’ by distance hikers for its lack of capillary (wicking) action. To explain, I’ll slip on my lab coat and grab some chalk for a science lesson. I’ll do my best to keep this accessible to our non-geek readers.

Before we begin, here’s your 3 key vocabulary terms for this lesson:

  • Conduction – is the transfer of heat when ‘hot’ molecules collide with neighboring cold molecules. Only heat can be conducted because cold is the absence of heat. Ex: I discovered early on that heat travels from the hot end of Mama’s cast iron skillet to the cold handle.
  • Insulator – materials that are poor conductors of heat. Air, cloth, wood, and water are poor conductors but make great insulators.
  • Heat transfer – thermal energy (heat) can be transferred via conduction, convection, and radiation.

What cotton holds against your skin

When dry, cotton fibers create air pockets to insulate your body. Air is an awesome insulator if it’s trapped in an area. However, cotton earns ‘killer’ status when wet.

Here’s why…

Cotton is a stingy absorber of moisture. Once saturated, it holds moisture better than polyester. When you step out of the shower, do you grab a cotton towel or synthetic one? Cotton holds on to what it absorbs.

Cotton soaks up moisture but does a lousy job of moving it away from your skin to outer layers of clothing. Your 100% cotton union suit looses its insulation value when the air pockets in the fiber fill with moisture from perspiration or water. The 50/50 cotton blends only prolong the process a bit. Either of these choices will leave you wet and cold!

The problem with being outside is Mother Nature’s mood swings. She seems to invent ways to make you shiver. If these conditions continue, hypothermia happens without self-directed action to reverse the drop in your body’s core temperature – even when it’s not freezing out.

So to be prepared, plan for the unpredictable.

Layers of Redundancy

Since humans aren’t feathered or fury (up for debate in some cases), the layered clothing strategy creates warm air pockets to slow the heat transfer from your 98.6 degree body to the external frigid temperatures. You’ve seen pictures of Sherpas standing on the top of Mt. Everest wearing a down-filled jacket. It’s not the feathers that insulate, it’s the air space created by the down trapped by the jacket shell.

Remember that heat transfer takes place from hot to cold – not the other way around.

Nature is constantly trying to create equilibrium. Thermal energy (heat) and humidity under your clothing seeks a path to colder, less humid conditions outside your body.

The first step in creating and maintaining that warm pocket of insulating air around your body is to stay dry. Due to its capillary action, I prefer polyester as a base layer against my skin.

On top of that, when conditions are cold but not wet, I wear a long sleeve cotton shirt with a wool sweater.  When it’s likely that I’ll be in wet/cold conditions, or some Doing the Stuff training with my B.O.B., I skip the cotton and go with a light merino wool or wool synthetic layer.

Frugal Tip: Never pay full price for expensive wool sweaters. Shop your local thrift stores and stock up on $5 merino wool. Ugly colors won’t matter when you need to stay warm and dry!

Some lovable wool facts:

  • Wool fiber absorbs up to 36% of its weight and gradually releases moisture through evaporation.
  • Wool has natural antibacterial properties that allow you wear it multiply days without stinking up camp. Not so with synthetics.
  • Wool wicks moisture, not as well as synthetics, but better than cotton.
  • Wool releases small amounts of heat as it absorbs moisture.
  • Wool contains thousands of natural air-trapping pockets for breathable insulation. Just ask any sheep.
Here's a 100% wool army blanket I hand stitched to make a hunting shirt.

Here’s a 100% wool army blanket I hand stitched to make a wool hunting shirt.

Now to add ‘skin’ to your outfit. The outer shell or skin can be anything that repels water. In a pinch, a contractor garbage bag will work to keep you warm and dry. Gore-Tex is pricey. You can pick up USGI poncho cheaply online or at military surplus stores. A poncho in your kit gives you options other than rain protection.

SmartPreppers are prepared for both wet and cold conditions! Does Killer Cotton have a place in your winter bug out ensemble? You bet! Here’s my top 5 reasons pack cotton.

Uses for 100% Killer Cotton

  1. 600 count bed sheets – just kidding. Wearing cotton inside your sleeping bag makes sense, though.
  2. Bandanas for making char cloth and many other uses
  3. Emergency TP. Ever tried cleaning your bottom in the wilderness with polypro?
  4. Sitting too close to the campfire dressed in synthetic material is not a good idea. Melted polypro on your skin will ruin your day! A flying ember on your flannel/wool shirt won’t melt.
  5. First aid – cotton and duct tape can be used as a makeshift bandage.

Final Thoughts

Our ancestors made it through extreme conditions without modern synthetic clothing. Would they have worn polypro underwear and base layers while forging the frontier? Probably.

Should you? Do you? Let us know your strategy and ideas in the comments. Stay safe and warm out there!

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. ~ As always, if anything from this site adds value to your life, please pass it on. You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, and our new Facebook pageThanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Doing the Stuff, equipment, Preparedness, Survival | Tags: , , | 12 Comments

My Top 10 Foods I’d Hate to Survive Without

by Todd Walker

Here’s the scene.

The inevitable happened. The world as we know it has ended. Trucks, planes, and trains stop unloading their goodies. The fragile power grid gives up the ghost. You and yours are as prepared as one can be to ride out the initial stage of the apocalyptic storm that’s raining zombies.

You’re cut off from other people and can’t barter for food. You’ve got shelter, water, first aid, and security measures in place. Now for the food.

Indulge me in my obvious futuristic mind experiment for a moment.

SONY DSC

 

Image Source

You’ve acquired a top-secret, new technology – the 3D Food Printer. This machine has the capacity to create a year’s worth of food for your family. Once you press ‘print,’ that’s your food choices for one year. Oh yea, you can press the button daily to ensure food freshness. There’s no limit on what you can program the machine to produce.

But – here’s the catch. You only get to choose 10 food items.

What 10 food items would you ‘print’ to help you thrive, not just survive for one year?

Here’s a few guidelines if you want to play along.

  • Have fun with your list. No justification needed :)
  • No food rules! Just ‘print’ your top 10 foods list in the comment section.

My Top 10 Foods I Would Hate to Survive Without

My dream list contains foods I eat in my Primal Lifestyle. Yours may differ (see #2 above). The choices are difficult. When choosing, I wanted to incorporate the pleasure of taste, nutrition profile, and comfort my food provides.

A.) Grass-fed beef filet mignon

We buy the whole filet and I cut it into steaks to freeze. When get the urge to eat steak, nothing beats a nutrient dense, naturally raised cow steak!

B.) Wild-Caught Salmon

Dirt Road Girl and I just enjoyed her rocking salmon recipe last night! I’d program the 3D machine to print the skin-on variety. Loads of good omega-3s with every flaky bite. Plus, I’d crisp up the skin in a cast iron skillet for salmon bacon!

C.) Kale

Kale, unlike its cousin Brussels sprouts, is actually edible and quite tasty. It also provides essential vitamins and minerals (Vitamins A, C, B6, E, manganese, potassium, calcium, and fiber).

D.) Free-range Eggs

With so many ways to prepare these nutrient-rich bombs, I’ve yet to find an egg I didn’t like! There full of essential fatty acids, protein, vitamins (more so than kale), iodine, and many other nutrients.

E.) Sweet Potatoes

I prefer these to regular potatoes. They offer some starch carbs, but not as much as plain old potatoes.

F.) Raw Heavy Cream

From grass-fed happy cows, of course. This goes on my kale recipe, in my coffee, and as an added bonus, gives me the ability to make butter, cream cheese, cheese, and yogurt. Redundancy!

G.) Coconut Oil

Here’s a 160 reasons why! ‘Nough said.

Coconut oil. A must have for a FAT Pantry!

Coconut oil. A must have for a FAT Pantry! Image courtesy of The Organic Prepper

H.) Cashews

How could I not ‘print’ a daily dose of these buttery nuts. I go through at least a handful a day. I also mix in almonds, walnuts, pumpkin, and sunflower nuts. But cashews are my go-to snack.

I.) High Cocoa Content Dark Chocolate with Almond Butter Spread

I know. I’m cheating with two items at once. But that’s how I eat my dark chocolate semi-regularly. My little dark indulgence has been shown to lower blood pressure, improve insulin sensitivity, and satisfy cravings world-wide. A great comfort food while you’re waiting for the apocalypse to pass.

J.) Wild Blueberries

Packed with anti-oxidant powers and vitamins, this is my favorite fruit! Being from the Peach State, I worked in peach packing sheds growing up and love peaches. But I’d ‘print’ blueberries for their nutrient profile.

I struggled over swapping the dark chocolate for a dusty bottle of Pinot Noir. I settled on the chocolate/almond butter. But given one more item, I’d add me some wine with my chocolate!

Your turn. What 10 foods would you program to ‘print’ to help you survive and thrive for one year? List them in the comment section below!

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. ~ Please share our stuff! If anything from our site adds value to your life, please pass it on. You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, and Facebook

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form for non-commercial purposes, in part or whole, with a link back to this site crediting the author. All embedded links in our posts must stay intact if you wish to repost our material. If you are interested in a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Preparedness, Real Food, Survival | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

5 Ways to be the Luckiest Survivor in the World

by Todd Walker

With only the clothes on his back and a lighter in his pocket, William LaFever survived over three weeks in the Utah desert. His predicament was not part of some ‘reality’ TV show. There wasn’t a host describing the next reward challenge. No immunity necklace. No cameras or medics standing by.

 

Image source

He was lucky to be found alive.

This story is full of teachable moments. Here are some take-aways from LeFever’s brush with death.

1.) Recognize survival situations

Anytime your basic needs go unmet, you’re in a survival scenario – whether you admit it or not.

Seasoned woodsmen, survivalists, and preppers are familiar with the Rule of 3′s: 3 minutes without air, 3 hours without shelter, 3 days without water, 3 weeks without food. Unless you find a way to meet these needs, you’re likelihood of dying grows exponentially.

2.) Ask yourself, “Do I feel lucky?” Well, do you, punk?

Luck is Unreliable in Any Survival Situation

The question must be asked…

Image source

Dirty Harry’s classic line makes you re-think dependence on luck. With a 44 Magnum pointed at the perps head, he had to decide if Clint had fired 6 rounds, or only 5.

Don’t roll the dice with Mother Nature!

Your luck increases by applying the 7 P’s (Prior Preparation and Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance). It’s smart to leave a detailed itinerary with at least one or two trusted friends about your trip plans. Do it even if you’re taking a short day hike, fishing, hunting, or camping.

These safe mini-adventures land many outdoor enthusiast in trouble. Mother nature is not fair and she finds creative ways to toss the unexpected into the mix.

Your itinerary should include these three W’s as a bare minimum:

  • Where and when you’re headed out. Including a map of the trails and area would be useful in affecting a rescue if necessary.
  • When you plan on returning. Your family should know where you’re headed and when to expect your return. If your overnight excursion takes a turn for the worse, they will know you’re in trouble and begin the process of locating and rescuing you.
  • Who and how many are in your group. Are there any special needs in the group (age, special needs, health conditions, male/female, etc.). LeFever’s family described him as having autism. While that might seem trivial to most, it turned out to be very helpful in locating the lost hiker. All humans need water to survive but people with autism seem to be drawn to water. Search-and-rescue focused on following the river. It paid off.

3.) Know your limits

Before being lost, the son called his dad to ask for money.

LaFever said he had run out of money and someone had stolen some of his hiking gear. Authorities said they assumed he was given a ride to Boulder, as he did not have his own vehicle.

“He didn’t want me to come out there,” said LaFever’s father, John LaFever. “He wanted me to send him some money to get him to Page.”

The wise move after someone had stolen his gear and he had daddy on the phone would have been to accept the money and fly or ride home. His decision to go-it-alone with no gear almost cost him his life.

“He made the mistake ‘I know what I am doing and I will be OK,”’ Bronson told CNN. “There are many who have done that and paid the price.” [Emphasis mine]

Could you survive on your wits and a lighter? Forage wild foods? Everything is edible once.

4.) D0n’t leave home without a kit

William was found about 30 miles further along the river than most casual hikers traveled. Even though he had camping/hiking experience, this was not the time to attempt this long journey with nothing but his clothes on his back and a lighter in his pocket.

To his credit, he survived by foraging roots, eating frogs, and possessing one of the most important pieces of survival gear – FIRE.

It can happen to any of us outdoors. Taking a wrong turn or slipping on a root and tumbling down a ravine on a short day hike can turn into a serious situation – especially when you’re close to home.

The I’m-close-to-home mentality turns our preparedness mentality into mush. Spending the night in the woods unprepared can have dire consequences.

For short outdoor outings, a basic kit should include:

  • Water, filter, metal container
  • Fire making material and equipment
  • Cutting tool
  • First aid supplies
  • Cordage and duct tape
  • Signal mirror and whistle (your best chance of surviving is being found)
  • Snack/food
  • Shelter – tarp and/or contractor garbage bag
  • Security – sidearm and extra magazines/ammo

There’s no such thing as basic emergencies. Plan accordingly.

5.) Doing the Stuff makes you the luckiest Survivor out there

Knowledge, gear, and skills are survival aids. When your hands are wet and freezing in a 30 mph wind, that’s not the time to attempt your first friction fire. Have redundant backups.

Practicing your skills with your gear builds knowledge and confidence. Doing the Stuff closes the gap on sloppy skills making you the luckiest survivor in the world.

Do you feel lucky? Luck is unreliable.

What makes you the ‘luckiest’ survivor in the backcountry? Do tell!

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. ~ Thanks for sharing the stuff! If anything from our site adds value to your life, please pass it on. You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, and our new Facebook page

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form for non-commercial purposes, in part or whole, with a link back to this site crediting the author. All embedded links in our posts must stay intact if you wish to repost our material. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Bushcraft, Camping, Doing the Stuff, Preparedness, Real Life Survival Success Stories, Survival | Tags: , , , | 3 Comments

Ten Sextacular Reasons Why More Sex Will Help You Stay on Top in the Coming Collapse

by Todd Walker

Pull up a chair. We need to have an adult ‘birds and the bees’ talk.

couples feet in bed

Image source

You may have heard the ‘talk’ early on in life. You sat at the kitchen table as mom or dad awkwardly fumbled for words to answer the “where do babies come from” question. You were on a need-to-know basis and I’m betting they left out these juicy details.

Coitus is far from just a procreative event. There’s more to getting intimate with our consenting adult partner than the survival of our species. Much more!

Optimal health rarely crosses our minds while sweating between the sheets. But scientists have discovered many benefits of regularly experiencing the big O …. my!

Acquiring knowledge is an important aspect of prepping. But here’s a big BUT… if you’re not Doing the Stuff (practicing what you’ve learned), your collection of cool ideas may leave you impotent when the need, ahem, arises.

For those with delicate sensitivities and uptightness who find sex talk offensive, please click away.

Wait! On second thought, you may benefit the most from this article.

Simply reading this information won’t garner the desired benefits. You have to start Doing the Stuff! (As if we need an excuse for more frequent coitus.)

Let’s get busy discussing the ins and outs of a good roll in the hay.

Ten Sextacular Reasons Why More Sex Will Help You Stay on Top in the Coming Collapse

Hay lofts are redundantly useful homestead structures! ;)

A.) Boosts Immune Response

Feel a cold or flu brewing? Forget the questionable chemical bombs in vaccines. Hooking up with your partner a few times a week can boost your resistance to all sorts of viral bugs. Researchers discovered higher levels of helpful endorphins (Immunoglobulin A) in folks with an active sex life.

B.) Lowers Stress Levels

A no brainer, right? The process of arousal and orgasm releases a chemical elixir of relaxants. Stress levels skyrocket after disasters. Not to mention our daily grind at work. Intimacy is a natural way to avoid Big Pharma’s pills and melt away tension.

C.) Saves Your Heart

Getting busy with your partner can reduce your chances of having a stroke and coronary heart disease. What’s the magic number on frequency? At least twice per week reduces your chances of dying from a heart attack by 50%!

D.) Stops Pain Better than a BC Power

Remember Marvin Gaye’s 1982 hit ‘Sexual Healing’?

It appears Marvin knew more than we gave him credit for. Oxytocin (known as the cuddling hormone) and a cascade of other biochemicals (norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin, vasopressin, melatonin, nitric oxide, estrogen, testosterone) are released during arousal and climax. This finding tosses the ‘headache excuse’ out the bedroom window! If your partner is experiencing physical pain, less sensual acts may not be the antidote.

You’ve heard that a good belly laugh is good medicine. So is sex. Morphine is a controlled drug in the opioid family for pain management. This medicine mimics our body’s natural pain-relieving endorphins. Your choice. Pills or pleasurable sexual healing!

E.) Reduces Inflammation from Arthritis

Your doctor probably never told you that sex helps reduce inflammation in your aching joints. Sexual arousal stimulates the adrenal glands to produce cortisone, an anti-inflammatory substance, that can turn agony into ecstasy.

F.) Sleep Aid

Guys get stereotyped as spiraling into a deep snore session after passionate play-time. Can you blame us? Sex is so relaxing!

And every guy loves the ‘P-word’ – Prolactin. Not what you were thinking? This hormone gives men feelings of satisfaction and the ‘everything is okay’ feeling. So we tend to sleep and lose our anxiety of the day. Men tend to sleep post-sex and women are left with cuddling their snoring partner.

Side note: My friend Gaye Levy has an excellent article on the importance of sleep over at Backdoor Survival. You need good sleep to function in the coming storm. Warning: No hanky-panky before pulling guard duty!

G.) Healthy Prostate

Frequently flushing the pipes by ejaculating has been proven to lower men’s risk of prostate cancer later in life. One study cited 21 times per month as the ideal frequency (solo counts). For the over-40 crowd, the flushing effect removes toxins that build up in the prostate.

H.) Functional Fitness

It’s estimated that making love burns between 120 to 250 calories per hour. Of course, the amount burned would depend the briskness of your romp. Even low activity levels during coitus elevates the heart rate and works your major muscle groups.

Overall fitness improves your sex life. And regular sex can improve your fitness level. It’s a win-win-smile situation!

I.) Longer Life

To live or not to live? That’s why we prep, right? A study in Wales found that having 2 or more orgasms per week reduced the risk of premature death by 50% compared to those who climaxed only once a month.

Making love 3 or more times per week can make you look ten years younger according to some research. Sex may be the fountain of youth preppers have been looking for – ;). Drink up!

J.) Lowers Blood Pressure

Whether you’re giving a big presentation at work, going through a personal SHTF scenario, or surviving TEOTWAWKI, loving touch releases our friendly hormone oxytocin to lower stress level and reduce blood pressure. If a long hug or caress holds these health benefits, just imagine the results of turning that long hug into an extended time between the sheets or a roll in the hay!

Here’s a few more on my Sextacular Honorable Mention list to help your thrive:

  • There’s a connection between romantic love and analytical thinking – problem solving
  • Stronger pelvic muscles and reduces the chance of complications during childbirth
  • Creates stronger bonds in couples and strengthens and overall sense of well-being
  • Increases estrogen levels and prompts collagen production for glowing skin, ladies!

I’ve often said that the worst day of fishing is better than your best day at work. The same can be said about sex. When it’s good, it’s mind-blowing! When it’s bad, it’s still not too bad.

Sex, like all survival skills, should be practiced even when you and your partner are not feeling frisky. The mood will follow. So will the sextacular benefits.

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. ~ Thanks for sharing the stuff! If anything from our site adds value to your life, please pass it on. You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, and our new Facebook page

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Doing the Stuff, Preparedness, Survival | Tags: , | 11 Comments

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