Posts Tagged With: Doing the Stuff Network

27 Basecamp Projects Guaranteed to Elevate Skills and Fun in the Woods

By Todd Walker

The thought of going to the woods for rest and relaxation is a foreign concept to most moderns. Others see it as an oasis. The later enjoy the simplicity of woods life for many reasons. Through experience, they’ve learned to be healthy, comfortable, and relaxed in the woods.

27 Basecamp Projects Guaranteed to Elevate Skills and Fun in the Woods - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Learning the art of “smoothin’ it” in the woods, as Nessmuk called it, is well within reach for even my novice middle school students. If you really want to learn how to camp in comfort, check out The Revival of Classic Camping.

If your camp is an oasis in the woods, you’re more likely to find the unplugged benefits of nature. Not only that, but you’ll gain valuable self-reliance skills in the process.

Below you’ll find 27 projects and skills developed while turning my basecamp into a comfortable personal space in the woods.

Shelter

The Art of 'Smoothing It' in Struggleville

Overhang catches and rolls heat into the shelter

We’ve discussed the importance of emergency shelter here, here, and here. However, a basecamp shelter should be semi-permanent and built for comfort.

My grandson and I hanging out at basecamp

My grandson and me hanging out at basecamp

My shelter design takes advantage of the properties of radiant heat from a fire one step away from the opening. The heat enters under the two foot lip overhang and circulates through the entire structure. This action makes the shelter more efficient than a simple lean-to.

Skills Learned

  • Ax-Manship ~> The ax is the oldest and most under-appreciated, yet invaluable tool which serves, not only as a wilderness lifeline, but, as a simple machine that connects your hands to a forgotten craft.
  • Campsite Selection ~> Consider the 4 W’s.  You need wood… lots of wood… for shelter construction and fire. Standing dead red cedar and a few other saplings were used for my shelter.
  • Knots/Lashing ~> Square, tripod, and diagonal lashing hold my shelter together. Timber hitch, clove hitch, trucker’s hitch, and other useful knots were also used.
  • Simple Machines ~> Here are my top 3 simple machines for shelter construction: Wedges (cutting tools), lever, and pulley.

Camp Tools

In this category, you’ll find ideas to make camp life enjoyable.

  • Saw Buck ~> This tool may be the most used of all the stuff at my camp. The obvious use is for bucking firewood. Max, my grandson, prefers this as a camp chair.

How to Build a Sturdy Sawbuck with Logs and Rope - www.TheSurvivalSherpa.com

  • Camp Maul ~> You’ll use ax and knife skills to craft this woodsman hammer. Watch our video here.
  • Shaving Ladder ~> My newest addition to basecamp. Wish I had discovered this long ago!
  • Takedown Buck Saw ~> A good bucksaw makes life easier when processing wood on my saw buck.
  • Cooking Tripod ~> A sturdy tripod is a multifunctional piece for every camp.
  • Stump Vise ~> A round section of wood used to hold stuff while working with both hands.

Camp Skills

  • Sleep ~> The #1 hallmark of a good woodsman.
  • Fire ~> My favorite skill to practice. You’ll find many articles on fire craft on this page.
  • Cooking ~> Nothing beats the smell and taste of a pan of dry cured bacon sizzling over an open fire. Basecamp cooking affords you the luxury of not eating from freeze-dried bag food. Check out my buddy’s YouTube channel, Feral Woodcraft, for more camp cooking tips. Bring your appetite!
6 Life and Survival Lessons Learned from Backpacking - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Dry cured bacon and dehydrated eggs… not your typical trail breakfast

Camp Crafts

Now that you’ve got tools made and a belly full of camp cooking, it’s time to make some fun stuff!

  • Tree Bark Arrow Quiver ~> Tulip Poplar (Magnolia) bark has been used by indigenous people and traditional craftsmen in Appalachia for thousands of years.
  • Primitive Pottery ~> Not my best skill by far, but making your own containers from clay gives you options.
  • Pitch Sticks ~> This project turns pine sap and charcoal into glue.
A spoon I found growing in a Black Walnut limb on our land

A spoon I found growing in a Black Walnut limb on our land

  • Greenwood Spoon Carving ~> Employ your ax and knife skills to craft eating utensils for camp.
  • Burn and Scrape Containers ~> A primitive skill useful in making spoons, bowls, and even canoes. Watch our video on making a cup here.
  • Leather Ax Sheath ~> Make a hands-free ax carrying sheath for tramping and scouting from basecamp.
  • Ax Handle ~> While I didn’t make this hickory ax handle at basecamp, it’s doable with the above mentioned tools.
  • Plumber’s Stove ~> On rainy days, you need a way to cook in your semi-permanent shelter. It also adds enough heat to knock the chill off.
  • Fire Pit ~> Wooden reflector walls are popular for bushcraft shelters. However, stone is better at retaining heat from your fire. Lay rocks to form a chimney effect to draw air for clean burns.
The large rock in the back acts as a chimney

The large rock in the back acts as a chimney

  • Frog Gig ~> A sapling and knife skills can have you eating in no time.
  • Camp Table ~> Every camp needs a horizontal surface (table).
Red cedar planks lashed a top two poles between trees

Red cedar planks lashed a top two poles between trees

  • Roycraft Pack Frame ~> A fun project to do with kids.
  • Build Community ~> Now that you’ve got your basecamp equipped and comfortable, invite friends over and burn sticks together. A lot can be learned from each other around a warm campfire. You’ll quickly become the smartest woodsman around.

My basecamp is never finished. There’s always more stuff to do and things to craft to make camping in the woods fun.

Note: This week marks the fourth year anniversary of Survival Sherpa. I started writing here a few weeks before Dirt Road Girl was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer. This little blog has provided much-needed clarity on our journey.

Our hearts are always encouraged by the ongoing support from each of you here. We’ve had the pleasure of personally meeting several of you and count it an honor to call you friends. Hope each of you have a merry Christmas and a self-reliant New Year!

Keep Doing the Stuff of Self-Reliance,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook… and over at the Doing the Stuff Network.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, Dirt Road Girl and I would appreciate your vote on Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding sites while you’re there… 

Thanks for Sharing the Stuff!

Copyright: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

 

Categories: Bushcraft, Camping, Doing the Stuff, Preparedness, Self-reliance, Survival Skills | Tags: , , , , , , | 23 Comments

3 Knives That Will Enhance Your Bushcrafting Tenfold

[Todd’s note: Before we get to Eric’s guest article, I wanted to ask you to tune in to a live show tonight at 9:00 pm EST. I’ll be chatting with my buddy and Doing the Stuff Network member, Joshua Shuttlesworth, from The 7 P’s Blog, to discuss a few of my favorite topics: fire craft, making your own gear, Doing the Stuff of Self-Reliance, and any stuff you’re interested in discussing!

Be sure to join us TONIGHT (07/28/2015) on American Preppers Network’s: Prepper Broadcasting Network for the 7 P’s Survival Radio Show.

Listen online herehttp://prepperbroadcasting.com/the-7-ps-of-survival/

Listen by phone here: (347) 202-0228 – and remember, if you have a comment or question just press 1 to join the live discussion. We look forward to hearing from you tonight whether it be in the chat room or on the air!]

______________________

by Eric Pangburn

Bushcrafting, a term coined in Australia and North America, refers to all skills that are a part of wildlife survival. A great knowledge and skill of bushcrafting can determine whether one lives or dies in the wild. While there are many tools that can enhance your outdoor skills, none are more important than a proper bushcrafting knife. The many different tasks in bushcrafting, such as making a shelter and setting traps, can’t be accomplished with your average pocket knife.

An excellent knife is determined by its maneuverability, toughness, and durability; any tool that is lacking in these areas will be ineffective in your quest for survival. A curved blade is typically your best bet more often than not, because those blades are the best at completing all kinds of tasks.

Choosing the right blade is difficult, as there is no definitive knife that beats the competition. There are, however, many excellent choices that would more than suffice in the outdoors. Here are three knives that stood out to me.

3: Helle Temagami

3 Knives That Will Enhance Your Bushcrafting Tenfold - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

If bushcraft knives had a beauty contest, this gorgeous blade would surely win first prize. Designed and crafted by Les Stroud of Survivorman, this wonder of the knife world was made to take a beating. The handle is graced with curly birch, and an oiling of linseed. Complimenting the handle is a blade composed of three layers of stainless steel, so that it won’t lose its sharpness easily.

2: Spyderco Bushcraft

3 Knives That Will Enhance Your Bushcrafting Tenfold - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Spyderco is a company that has made its name known for folders used by military and law enforcement advocates alike. On top of that, however, they also make a good knife, and their Bushcraft is no exception. Designed by a bushcraft expert, BushcraftUk.com, and Spyderco, this knife is as durable as they come. Its high carbon steel blade retains its razor-sharp edge with ease, and an added thumbhole on the handle allows for a better grip during more difficult tasks.

1: Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Companion

3 Knives That Will Enhance Your Bushcrafting Tenfold - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

This is the behemoth of all bushcrafting knives. Weighing an entire pound, this monster of a tool was designed for heavy work (no pun intended). A make of 1095 Cro-Van carbon steel and chrome carbides make this blade exceptional at every task you throw at it, while still keeping its sharpness and form like none other. The knife is so strong that the handle was made with guards on both edges to protect your hand during great usage. The Companion is not flexible, but the blade can be detached to make a spearhead that would be enough to make any bear question attacking you.

Author bio:

Eric Pangburn is a blogger, an avid sports fan, and ‘Naked & Afraid’ fan. He enjoys gear for guys, cool stuff, and cool survival gear.  Also make sure you connect with him over on Twitter @DudeLiving

Keep Doing the Stuff of Self-Reliance,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook… and over at the Doing the Stuff Network.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, Dirt Road Girl and I would appreciate your vote on Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding sites while you’re there… 

Thanks for Sharing the Stuff!

Copyright: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Bushcraft, Camping, Gear, Preparedness | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

50+ Dumpster Diva Hacks that Convert Waste to Wealth

by Todd Walker

Part of our Self-Reliant Summer series

possum mentality will lead people to think you’re cheap. In our propped up economy, I call it industrious, resourceful, and plain smart. Why buy stuff with hard-earned cash when other people’s trash is everywhere?

Over 50 Dumpster Diva Hacks to Convert Waste to Wealth

Dumpster diving is certainly NOT above the members of our Doing the Stuff Network. These resourceful folks embody the Dumpster Diva mentality. In fact, repurposing or up-cycling everyday items is an integral part of homesteading, prepping, bushcrafting, back-to-basics living, and emergency first aid.

Once you catch the Dumpster Diva bug, you’ll view dumpsters as treasure chests! I’m sure our handlers have pesky prohibitions against this uncivilized pursuit – so dumpster dive at your own risk. Ask permission from business owners before taking what you think is trash. Especially when prowling for pallets. Most businesses recycle pallets and consider taking without permission theft.

But here’s the thing…

You don’t have to actually dig in dumpsters to repurpose stuff. Up-cycle, repurpose, and re-trash are trendy terms for what our grandparents did to get through hard times. Use it up, wear it out, and then find another use for the item other than its intended purpose.

Check out the projects below and get in touch with your trashy side.

Dumpster Diving for Self-reliance

1.) Cheap to Free Stuff

That metal DVD rack collecting dust could be repurposed to feed rabbits.

Grace (DST Networker) up-cycled a 25 cent yard sale find to dispense hay in her rabbit hutch.

Grace (DST Networker) up-cycled a 25 cent yard sale find to dispense hay in her rabbit hutch.

She could have dumped several dollars at the local feed and seed but went all Dumpster Diva and made an unconventional – yet functional – rabbit feeder.

2.) Landfill Love

Michael, my brother from another mother, found an 18 foot long tent and other items he repurposed from the local landfill.

Landfill Love

I think his best up-cycling miracle performed was when his gas tank on his old Datsun pickup ruptured. He ran a gas line from a gallon gas can to his engine with the can sitting inside the hood of his truck. A fire hazard? Yes. But he had to drive to work and this was a short-term fix. Might come in handy in a bug out scenario. Redneck genius!

3.) Billboards

You didn’t hear me wrong. Large tarps are expensive but have endless uses around a homestead…

  • Protect equipment from weather
  • Wind block
  • Shade animals
  • Ground cloth
  • Roofing, etc., etc.
Here's Your Sign: Turning Trash Into Survival Treasure

A shot of my 14′ x 40′ tarp from my shop roof

I bought a 14′ by 40′ billboard for $14 a few months ago. A portion was used as a roof for my trapping shelter (personal space). A few of our readers have scored free tarps by just asking the work crew for old billboards!

4.) Pallets

With a little sweat equity, free wood for projects around your homestead, yard, handicrafts, or house can be found in wooden shipping pallets. No disassembling required for some projects. Here’s some DiY pallet projects from around the web to get your mind geared to repurpose…

I love it when people start trading theory for action! Resilient Man emailed the first steps of his journey to self-reliance and active resilience. He’s getting his hands dirty using pallets to build a chicken coop.

5.) Containers

Without becoming an obsessive compulsive hoarder, you can turn waste into wealth. The key here is to organize waste to prevent your house from becoming a death trap of trash.

The plastic five gallon bucket may be the most under appreciated prep item ever… until you need one and none are to be found. Ever tried to create your own containers from raw materials? Not an easy task! That goes double for glass.

Keep your wine bottles, mason jars, and other glass items. For an unusual use of mason jars, check out our post on Mason Jar Oil Lamps. They make Healthy Fast Food meals as well!

6.) Think Before You Toss Everyday Items

Here’s a round-up from a few of my Prepared Blogger friends who can help you take dumpster diving, repurposing, and up-cycling to new levels.

7.) First Aid/Medical

Lizzie over at Underground Medic put together Ten unconventional additions to your emergency medical kit worth checking out.

If you haven’t discovered the many survival uses for duct tape yet, The Survival Doctor (Dr. James Hubbard) wrote an entire book on how to use duct tape for medical emergencies – Duct Tape 911: The Many Amazing Medical Things You Can Do to Tape Yourself Together

The Dumpster Diva Award goes to…

One of our amazing members of the Doing the Stuff Network is now crowned Dumpster Diva! She and her husband are building a homestead house (Earthship) out of old tires!

Earthship house being built by a Doing the Stuff Networker

Dumpster Diva’s house in progress!

I hope Part 2 in the Self-Reliant Summer Series encourages you to trade theory for ACTION! We’re planning an entire summer of self-reliance articles to keep us Doing the Stuff. If you missed Part 1, you can find it here.

What’s your favorite repurposing hack for self-reliance and preparedness? Comments are always welcome…

Keep Doing the Stuff,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook page… and over at the Doing the Stuff Network on PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, Dirt Road Girl and I would appreciate your vote on Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding sites while you’re there…

Thanks for Sharing the Stuff!

Copyright: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

 

Categories: DIY Preparedness Projects, Doing the Stuff, First Aid, Frugal Preps, Preparedness, Self-reliance | Tags: , , , , | 10 Comments

Doing the Stuff Network Update

by Todd Walker

Here’s a quick update on the our network…

Todd's Tomato Ladders in primary colors

One DTS Network member’s tomato ladder garden

We launched the DTS Network two months ago in an effort to encourage other like-minded people to learn a minimum of one new self-reliant skill in 2014.

You responded by sharing the skills you’re learning in this blog’s comment section, social media, and via email. DRG and I are amazed at the response. Not surprised, just stoked to see people from all walks of life learning new skills and honing existing ones.

We all benefit from our open source learning community! Kathy A. recently shared her permaculture adventures on our Facebook group which sparked DRG to begin pursuing this skill.

Other topics being discussed and shared include…

  • Primitive fire making
  • Cast iron cookware
  • Food storage
  • Food preservation techniques
  • Firearms/shooting
  • Home brewing
  • Trade skills
  • Natural cleaners and body care
  • Gardening/seed starting/green houses
  • Animal husbandry
  • Trapping/tanning hides
  • HAM communications
  • Bushcrafting
  • Aquaponics
  • Homesteading
  • Optimal health/functional fitness

Sound interesting?

If you’re ready to add to your skill set, we invite you to join the Doing the Stuff Network and share what you’re doing with our community. It’s all about trading theory for action! What works in the pages of books and blogs doesn’t always translate to real world success.

Looking forward to learning from you.

Keep Doing the Stuff,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook pageReady to trade theory for action? Join us in the Doing the Stuff Network on these social media sites: PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook. Use the hashtag #DoingTheStuff when sharing your stuff on Twitter.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, DRG and I would appreciate your vote on the Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding Prepper sites while you’re there…

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: Doing the Stuff | Tags: | 1 Comment

Grab Your DTS Network Button

;

by Todd Walker

Less than a month ago we started the Doing the Stuff Network. And we’re so glad we did! If you’d like to join us, or just see what this stuff is about, click here. Our Facebook group is very active in sharing and helping each other with new skills.

Kat Yorba, a contributor to this blog, suggested I add a DTS Network button for any members who’d like to let others know they’re a part of the network. Well, being the non-geek that I am, Kat graciously did the grunt work for us and created our button. I added it to our sidebar but haven’t figured how to put the code stuff under it. Maybe I don’t have to. I’ve emailed Kat for help!

;

Anywho, here’s the button for anyone is interested:

Doing The Stuff Network
Categories: Doing the Stuff | Tags: | 2 Comments

Uncle Otha’s DiY Fat Lighter’d Torch

by Todd Walker

Uncle Otha was fond of fat lighter’d. He grew up in the first Great Depression, served in WWII, and told campfire stories around his pot of squirrel stew simmering over an open fire. He was a frugal Doer of the Stuff!

One of his trademark skills, besides being the best camp cook ever, was improvisation. He made use of stuff that we (his nephews) often overlooked. Here’s one of his fixin’ ideas. It wasn’t original to him. Pioneers used these years before we arrived on the scene. So, to preserve a lost skill, he passed it down to us.

Fat Lighter’d Torch

Our camp was often illuminated by rustic lighter’d knot torches. A Coleman fuel saver. And way cooler than modern white light. Very Daniel Boone-ish!

You obviously need fat wood to make a lighter’d torch. Don’t have fat lighter’d in your woods? Here’s suggested substitutes from commenters on this post from: Alaska – birch bark; Pacific NW – all coniferous trees; Parts Unknown – dead mimosa tree. The key ingredient for fat lighter’d is the flammable resin. Since it’s in abundance in my neck of the woods, that’s what I use.

Tools and Supplies

  • Cutting tool (axe, knife, saw, hatchet)
  • Fat wood
  • Dead pine branch
  • Fire

Step 1: Find a dead pine tree with a 3 to 4 inch diameter base where it attached to the tree trunk. I found a tree downed by a storm two years ago behind my school. You can use a dead limb on a live tree as well.

Uncle-Otha's-DiY-Fat-Lighter'd-Torch

My hatchet from my Junk in the Trunk emergency vehicle kit came in handy.

Cut the torch pole about 6 to 7 feet long. This length allows you to anchor it in the ground and provide an elevated light.

Step 2: Remove about a foot of bark off the knot end of the pole (where it met the tree trunk).

Uncle-Otha's-DiY-Fat-Lighter'd-Torch

I’m using a baton on my axe… not swinging toward my leg!

Once the bark is removed, split the end into four quarters with your cutting tool. Make the splits about a foot into the pole.

Step 3: Collect strips of fat wood in various sizes – from shavings to pencil sized.

Uncle-Otha's-DiY-Fat-Lighter'd-Torch

Uncle-Otha's-DiY-Fat-Lighter'd-Torch

 

Step 4: Spread the splits on the end of your torch pole (step #2) and begin insert a piece of lighter’d at the base of each split to create four distinct quarters of wood. These gaps provide air flow as the torch burns. Sprinkle shavings of fat wood down in the cracks as you insert the larger pieces. Don’t pack the splits too full of kindling pieces. Fire needs air.

I also crush and sprinkle dried pine resin in with the kindling. Not necessary, but adds to the heat.   

Step 5: Make a feathered stick of fat lighter’d and insert it in the top of your torch. Feathering makes more surface area and easy lighting.

Resin-Rich Fat Lighter'd: Nature's Most Prized Firestarter

Feathering fat lighter’d

Uncle-Otha's-DiY-Fat-Lighter'd-Torch

Notice the dried chucks of pine resin to the right.

Step 6: Light your torch. Apply proper safety procedures with any fire. I burned mine at home over our backyard fire pit.

Uncle-Otha's-DiY-Fat-Lighter'd-TorchThis torch didn’t burn very well. It needed wider gaps in the four splits. Tweak yours as needed.

Here’s a peek at my next “Doing the Stuff” project… Replacing axe handles. I’ll have it up by Friday!

Uncle-Otha's-DiY-Fat-Lighter'd-Torch

This is the small camp axe I used in the this fat lighter’d torch tutorial. The latex gloves have a purpose. 🙂

Enjoy your fat lighter’d torch responsibly and pass on your skills to the next generation.

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. – You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook page. The Doing the Stuff Network community can be found here: PinterestGoogle +, Facebook, and by using the hashtag #DoingTheStuff on Twitter.

P.P.S ~ If you find value in our blog, DRG and I would appreciate your  vote on the “Top Prepper Sites“! You can vote daily by clicking here. Check out all the other value-adding Prepper Sites while you’re there.

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

 

Categories: Bushcraft, Camping, DIY Preparedness Projects, Doing the Stuff | Tags: , , , | 16 Comments

Martial Arts: Resilience Against Physical Force

The philosophy behind Doing the Stuff is simple… Trading theory for ACTION. We’ve had a great response from folks joining the DTS Network. We’re excited for all of you who have traded theory for action and joined us on our journey!

I’ve updated our DTS page and added a list of Trusted Resources who add value to the preparedness community. If you have a moment, be sure to check out both pages. While you’re there, let us know if you want to join the journey by trading theory for action.

After introducing the Doing the Stuff Network, I was contacted by Resman who blogs at Resilient Man. He caught the vision of Doing the Stuff and wants to move more towards the practical skills side of survival and not as heavy on theory.

I thought I’d introduce him and allow you to get to know him a bit. You can check out his bio at the end of this post.

________________

by Resman

I have been in Martial arts for 20 years. This is what I have learnt .

Guy giving a Side Kick

Image source

Martial arts as a form of physical resilience.

Think long-term when choosing a defense system.

I started training when I was 14 I am 40 today, I have a bad back, somedays my left knee bothers me more than I wish and my right does tingle a bit. If I do more than 15 pullups my elbow is sore for a week. My point is choose a system you can use when you are 40, 50 or 60. Forget about kickboxing and Taekwondo, too many high kicks. I have been there, done that and know I suffer the consequences everyday.

Leverage Early.

This means, learn an art or a system that can use everyday items as weapons.

When I was in my teens, I thought I could take on the world with my bare hands. Twenty two years later I know that my thinking was irrational but typical for an 18-year-old. At 40, I have to start learning new systems that use sticks and knives. At this point I understand the importance of weapons such as an umbrella or a simple pen. Using such every day items for self-defense could mean life or death, an umbrella can help you deal with two attackers (range), a pen can help you defend yourself in a confined space (penetration).

Depending on stamina and power alone just because you physically can is something you will regret, at some point in the future. In a decade or two your body will no longer be able to cope with the stress of high intensity martial arts.

Ironically, when I was younger I was never bothered in the street I had the “do not f*** with me” body and look . Now I have to say I do not look like a marine anymore and I have been “hassled” more frequently by younger punks and I presume, that the older you get the easier of a target you become. Which means that the older you are the more you need your martial arts!

Look at your parents, and you can see your future.

My father has a bad back, my mother is lactose intolerant. I suffer from both. Martial arts may amplify chronic issues such as joint pain and back pain.

Read the rest here

Author bio:

I am 40 years old. Live in continental Europe. My introduction to the world of prepping was through the scouts, at the age of 10. Up to my early 30s prepping and survival where at the very heart of my life. In my 20s looked at prepping as a set of individual skills and materials that one needed to acquire in order to survive. In my 40s I believe that one’s ability to be a productive part of society no matter how it will transform itself in the future is a more efficient way to survive than going it alone. Having skills that will be of service to others is the only way to ensure a safe transition, if society will ever transition to something else.

Resman blogs at Resilient Man.

_______________

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. – You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook page. The Doing the Stuff Network community can be found here: Pinterest, Google +, and Facebook.

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

 

Categories: Doing the Stuff, Resilience, Self Defense | Tags: , , , | 3 Comments

Wishbone vs Backbone: Introducing the Doing The Stuff Network

by Todd Walker

Want to make 2014 your most productive, prepared year ever?

Here’s how…

Don’t put a wishbone where your backbone should be!

Doing The Stuff Network

You may wish you had more self-reliance, food security, liberty, optimal health, mad survival skills or less body fat. Many of you, myself included, have made resolutions year after year only to be crushed by failure’s weight.

Stop with all the wishful-thinking and resolutions.

I’ll go even further with more shocking advice – stop setting goals!

Let me explain…

First, let’s put down the crack pipe full of wishful thoughts so we can talk reality.

Our conventional method is doomed from the moment we make the wish. Wishful thinking won’t magically transform into real, long-term results. The same holds true for setting goals.

Four years ago I made a resolution to quit making resolutions to reach an event on the calendar. Ironically, I’ve stuck to my resolution.

By reading this, I assume you want to progress in your climb to preparedness and self-reliance. You (I say “you” when I really mean me) have set goals in the past in a desperate attempt to control future events. We can’t control or predict the future. There’s the disconnect. We only control the steps we take today.

If that’s true, and it is, how do we move forward on our journey together?

The secret is in the process – not wishing a goal will be met! Preparedness is not a climb to some mythical summit. It’s a long journey of small, deliberate steps. 

Make resolutions and goals if that works for you. But please keep in mind that deliberate action takes backbone. Boring backbone!

If you’re seriously sick of having a wishbone where your backbone should be, DRG and I extend a personal invitation for you to join the Doing The Stuff Network.

It’s free to join – no membership fees, no secret handshakes, completely voluntary, skills oriented, and hype-free!

Join the Doing The Stuff Network

A person values whatever he acts to gain or keep.

Knowledge may weigh nothing, but until you act logically, knowledge alone won’t matter in the crucible of life. The laws of nature require all living things to act to sustain life.

Here’s the picture we’re painting. Doing the Stuff takes ACTION. The act of doing is the antidote for wishbones.

We’re building a network of regular people (like your and me) to share our skills, progress, challenges, epic fails, and victories on our preparedness journey together. This community is not a tribe of theorists. 

We are trading theory for action!

Interested?

Who can join?

To be completely upfront and honest, this community is not open to everyone.

Here’s the only prerequisite to joining the DTS Network …

No spectators allowed!

If you’ve been a spectator on the sidelines and are ready to get some skin in the game, you’re welcome to join. Already doing the stuff? You’re welcome too. Anyone willing to take a series of self-generated, individualized, deliberate actions to decrease dependency and grow self-sufficiency can join.

Be sure to wear your blue-collar. You’ll get your hands dirty!

What can you expect by joining?

By joining the DTS Network, you’re committing to learn a minimum of one new skill in 2014.

Really!? Only one new skill… in a year!?

Yep!

Don’t write us off as underachievers just yet. People are busy. But one more skill gets you one step closer on our climb.

Here’s the catch…

Once you’ve learned that new skill, you’ll want to learn another one. Warning: Doing the stuff is an addictive gateway drug with side effects of preparedness and self-reliance. Use with reckless abandon.

We welcome only those willing to commit to the process of doing the stuff in 2014! That includes young doers of the stuff. There’s no age limit. Get your kids involved and make this a family, group, or home school project. Along our journey, we’ll help each other carry the heavy stuff, celebrate successes, analyze failures, and make adjustments – without lame, self-appointed ex-pert attitudes!

How do you join the journey?

We’ll keep it Sherpa simple! Find the tab called the “Doing the Stuff” located at the top of our site. Click to open the page and leave a comment letting your fellow DTS Networkers know you’re joining the journey.

Sharing the Stuff

To share the stuff you’re doing, which is one purpose of the DTS Network, we encourage you to use the “Doing the Stuff” page comment section and/or your favorite social media site(s). Be sure to use the hashtag #DoingTheStuff to make it easy for others to connect with you.

Here are 3 dedicated social media pages we created for you to share and connect with your fellow DTS Networkers:

  • Pinterest – We’ve created a group board called “Doing the Stuff Network” for you to Pin your projects. It’ll be our DTS family refrigerator for all our “fridge worthy” self-sufficiency skills we’re working on. 🙂 If you’re on Pinterest and would like to Pin the Stuff on this board, you’ll need an invite to Pin your Stuff. Message me with your Pinterest user name and I’ll invite you to the group.
  • Facebook – You can join our closed FB group, “Doing the Stuff Network“, and post updates on your journey. If you’d like, you can share on your personal FB page as well.
  • Google + – Same as the above groups. You can join the “Doing the Stuff Network” community by requesting an invite.
  • Twitter – There’s no Doing the Stuff Network account on Twitter. Simply use the #DoingTheStuff hashtag on your projects, questions, or discussions.

How do you know what stuff to start doing?

There are certain skills that we all need to pursue for a self-sufficient lifestyle. These categories are broad. Taking action to gain or improve your skills in a sustainable fashion will help to preserve your life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. And we’ll have fun in the process!

Go ahead and check out the categories on the “Doing the Stuff” page and get started. Feel free to suggest skills that may not be listed yet.

Now is the time to replace your wishbone with that boring backbone you’ve always wanted!

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. – You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook page. The Doing the Stuff Network community can be found here: PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook. Lots of good stuff going on here… check it out!

P.P.S ~ If you find value in our blog, DRG and I would appreciate your  vote on the “Top Prepper Sites“! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding Prepper Sites while you’re there.

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

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Categories: Doing the Stuff | Tags: , , , | 9 Comments

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