Posts Tagged With: DIY Preparedness Project

20+ Ultimate DiY Gifts to Help Load Santa’s Survival Sleigh

by Todd Walker

Bless her heart, my mom still uses a paper towel holder I made for her in 7th grade shop class. To everyone’s amazement, my hand-crafted gift has dispensed thousands of sheets of ‘napkins’ for over 40 years!

It’s not that my gift was the best designed dispenser of Bounty. It takes up counter space, and admittedly, isn’t real pleasing to the eye. However, it was never conveniently ‘lost.’

What’s the secret to my gift’s longevity in my mom’s kitchen?

I made it with my hands! The simple pinewood piece meant more to my mom than if had plopping down a few bucks at K-Mart for an ugly Christmas sweater.

Over the last two years of this blog, I’ve shared my passion for Doing the Stuff – DiY style. These projects create useful stuff, build confidence in your skills, knowledge, and overall preparedness – changing your tune from “I could never do that” to —> “How hard can it be!”

I’ve included the best here. Some are easy, require minimal skill, time, and money. That’s encouraging in our shrinking economy, right!? Others may stretch your handcrafting skills and budget. But still cheaper than a lot of store-bought junk!

Either way, both the giver and receiver benefit. Your DiY skills improve and Uncle Otha will likely treasure your handcrafted gift!

Let’s get started packing Santa’s Survival Sleigh!

Gear and Stuff

Secret Book Safe

  • Skill level: Intermediate
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 1 hour with a scroll saw; 2-3 hours with a utility knife
30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

Salvation lies within” – The Shawshank Redemption

I bought this book for one dollar at a thrift store. There’s plenty of room to hide valuables within! Take a look…

30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

Emergency fiat cash and a gun… nice combo!

Here are the instructions I followed to make my book safe (via The Art of Manliness). I used my scroll saw which speeds the process considerably.

Cigar Fishing Kit

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 1 hour

Cigar sleeve, duct tape, bank line, electrical tape, fishing line, strike anywhere matches, fire starter , dry flies, artificial lizard/worm, non-lead weights, 3 types of fishing hooks, metal leader, swivels, 2 floats/bobbers, and a snack size zip-lock bag.

Give a man a fish, and he eats for a day…Teach him to make a cigar fishing kit and he can survive the apocalypse. Makes an excellent stocking stuffer!

Fight the Cold: Homemade Pocket Warmers courtesy of Tess Pennington at Ready Nutrition

  • Skill level: Beginner/Intermediate
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 1 hour with sewing skills

Homemade pocket hand warmers are great for cold winter days!

Adjustable Paracord Rifle Sling

  • Skill level: Beginner/Intermediate
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 1 hour

Paracord is the duct tape of outdoor survival. These slings contain about 100 feet of this indispensable stuff. The black sling is adjustable.

A DiY Survival Sling Shot with Big Game Capabilities

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 1-2 hours
A DiY Survival Sling Shot with Big Game Capabilities

A DiY Survival Sling Shot with Big Game Capabilities

Hunt, fish, or just have family fun with this one!

How to Build a Rocket Stove to Impress the Boys – courtesy of Jamie at Prepared Housewives

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 1 hour
30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

Courtesy of Prepared Housewives

An emergency stove that cooks on a handful of twigs.

Building a Sawbuck: Work Smarter in the Woodpile

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: $10-$15
  • Time: 1 hour
Sawbuck: Work Smarter in the Woodpile

Big Orange punishing that fence crusher!

This is a simple, back-saving tool for cutting firewood. You could probably build it in 30 minutes or less.

Jim’s DiY Fuel Transfer Pump: Don’t Spit or Swallow

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: $100 – less with parts on hand
  • Time: 10 to 15 hours
30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

Battery operated fuel pump

Throw this behind the seat of your truck or in the trunk just in case.

Farmhouse Table

  • Skill level: Intermediate
  • Cost: $150-$200
  • Time: 10 to 15 hours
Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

Surprise your wife with a farmhouse table!

The 5 Minute Tin Olive Oil Lamp

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 5 minutes or less
30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

DiY olive oil lamp

Seriously, you can make this in under 5 minutes!

Elevated Compost Tumbler

  • Skill level: Beginner/Intermediate
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 2-3 hours
30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

DRG’s elevated compost tumbler

This allows you to open the door and dump black gold into your wheel barrow for easy transfer!

#10 Can Stove Gift Idea courtesy of Jodi at Food Storage Made Easy

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 30 minutes

Folding Tomato Ladders 

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 1 hour
20+ Ultimate DiY Gifts for Santa's Survival Sleigh

Four Tomato Ladders anchored and ready with an old wooden ladder on the far left.

How to Make a Fire Piston For Under 10 Bucks via Preparing for SHTF

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 30 minutes
20+ Ultimate DiY Gifts to Load Santa's Survival Sleigh

Plumbing supply fire piston!

I love using plumbing supplies for survival stuff! I’ve got the cooper stub out and other supplies to try this one!

Natural Health

DIY Miracle Healing Salve – courtesy of Gaye Levy at Backdoor Survival

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 30 minutes to make and 24 hours to set up

DIY Miracle Healing Salve   Backdoor Survival

Haven’t tried this recipe yet but Gaye swears by it for all manner of ache, pains, and skin issues.

Nourishing Tallow Balm with Essential Oils – courtesy of  at GNOWFGLINS

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 30 minutes to make and 24 hours to set up

30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh

Tallow fat is 50 to 55 percent saturated, just like our cell membranes, making it helpful for skin health and compatible with our biology. Be sure to only use grass-fed tallow for your recipe. I’ve been experimenting with tallow on my skin and have seen good results.

You can buy tallow. But this a DiY post. Here’s how I render my small batches of tallow. Wardee made 8 1/2 gallons at once here!

Healthy Household: Master Tonic courtesy of Caroline Cooper at Eatkamloops

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 30 minutes to make and 6 weeks to infuse for maximum potency
30 Ultimate DiY Gifts in Santa's Survival Sleigh
Courtesy of eatkamloops.org

An all-purpose tonic for cold and flu season. Remember to label and date your Master Tonic. Infuse for six weeks for maximum potency.

Homemade Decongestant Chest Rub courtesy of Adrienne at Whole New Mom

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: 30 minutes

DIY Chest Rub Recipe! Ditch the Vicks® and make this instead! No added chemical nasties and much cheaper!

Food

Down and Dirty Sauerkraut

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: Depends on the batch size – one week to ferment

20120505-141315.jpg

Fermented foods have sustained humans for thousands of years. Add a jar to your pile of stocking stuffers!

Pemmican: Bread of the Wilderness

  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: If ingredients are prepared properly, 30 minutes to make

Like most things survival related, it’s best to experience it first hand before counting on it with your life. I don’t recommend it for Christmas dinner. If prepared properly, it’ll last for Christmases to come. You can follow my recipe or try these.

25 DIY Weekend Preparedness Projects courtesy of Angela at Food Storage and Survival

  • Skill level: Varies
  • Cost: Varies
  • Time: Weekend – depending on how many you tackle

25 easy DIY prepper projects for preparedness and survival.

Thought I’d include this one in case you need more ideas.

Keep Doing the Stuff!

Todd

P.S. ~ As always, if anything from this site adds value to your life, please pass it on. You can also connect with us on TwitterPinterest, and our new Facebook pageThanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

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Categories: DIY Preparedness Projects | Tags: , , | 13 Comments

33 Awesome DiY Projects for Preppers

by Todd Walker

DiY skills may one day turn a tinkering hobby into life-saving knowledge. Turning book knowledge into useful stuff takes initiative.

33 Awesome DiY Projects for PreppersYou have to start somewhere.

Below you’ll find a slew (33 counts as a slew, right?) of ideas to help you on your journey to self-reliance and preparedness. Most will take only a few minutes and minimal skills. Others require hours and sweat equity. Doers of the Stuff don’t mind. It’s just what we do.

Let’s get started Doing the Stuff:

  1. Cigar Fishing Kit
  2. Drinking Straw Sewing Kit
  3. The 5 Minute Tin Olive Oil Lamp
  4. Fletching Arrows Duct Tape
  5. A DIY Fire Bow On Training Wheels
  6. Get Your Gut In Shape: Down and Dirty Sauerkraut
  7. Pemmican: Bread of the Wilderness
  8. Camouflage Your Rifle DIY Style
  9. Arm Pit Probiotics and DiY Deodorant
  10. Dirt Road Girl Compost Tumbler
  11. Rendering Tallow for Cooking and 12 Other Uses
  12. Camouflaging DiY Rain Barrels for Front Yard Gardens
  13. Go Herbal: Putting Together Your Go-To Herbal Medicine Kit
  14. Ollas: Ancient Low Tech and Low Cost Sub-Surface Irrigation System
  15. DiY Fire Starter in a Drinking Straw
  16. Todd’s Tomato Ladders: No More Lame Cages
  17. Do It Yourself Survival – PART 1 – Low Cost DIY Projects for Preppers
  18. Clever Storage Idea For Old DVD Containers
  19. Making a “Honey-Do” Bench from a Cedar Tree with Pioneer Tools
  20. Healthy Household: Homemade Medical Kits
  21. A DiY Farmhouse Table, DRG’s Grocery Bag, and Chair Planter
  22. Running on Empty: Siphoning Gas without Sucking
  23. A DiY Survival Sling Shot with Big Game Capabilities
  24. Deconstructing My Adjustable Paracord Rifle Sling…Just for You
  25. Physical Preparedness: Practical Performance for Real-World Survival (Doing the stuff in natures gym)
  26. Vertical Spine Shelves for Small Spaces
  27. DiY Pallet Garden Fence and 100 Year Old Windows
  28. The Dirt on Moving Raised Beds to Full Sun
  29. Coffee Can Hobo Stove
  30. HOW TO BUILD A ROCKET STOVE TO IMPRESS THE BOYS 😉
  31. Lighten Your BOB: Pack The Alpha Tent
  32. DIY Preparedness: Ed’s Red Bore Cleaner Recipe
  33. Arming Yourself for the Zombie Apocalypse: How to Build the Ultimate Survival Shotgun

I know y’all have more to add to this list. Drop us a line about your DiY projects and ideas in the comments (with links if you have them) and add value to our community!

Keep doing the stuff,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, YouTube and Facebook page… and over at the Doing the Stuff Network on PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, Dirt Road Girl and I would appreciate your vote on Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding sites while you’re there…

Thanks for sharing the stuff!

Copyright Information: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: DIY Preparedness Projects, Doing the Stuff | Tags: , | 49 Comments

DIY Preparedness: The 5 Minute Tin Olive Oil Lamp

by Todd Walker

Got a minute or 5? Last night I made an emergency lamp out of a breath mint tin, wick, and olive oil… in 4:41 minutes. It will probably take you less time but I’m slow.

I love to re-think and re-purpose common items we usually throw in the landfill. I build my signature “outhouse” birdhouse out of old barn wood and used pallets. I’ll have to post a DIY article on that soon. Back to today’s quick DIY adventure.

An easy project is this oil lamp. You can use any container you like. I chose a breath mint tin since I have a large collection of them from each school year. I always hated teachers bending down at my desk and breathing horrid, putrid breath on me. So I eat lots of mints teaching. I also like the tins with lids so I can throw one in my bag for wilderness trips. Just render some animal fat for fuel and you’ve got a long-lasting source of light. It creates great ambiance after the meat has been cooked over the open fire and the lies around the campfire begin to fly. Whatever!

Here’s how I made mine. You’ll probably make one that beats mine like a drum. Please share if you do.

Materials

Breath mint tin (color to match wife’s decor – I gave her three color choices. I’m nice like that)

Wick – Use only material with natural fibers. Man-made polyester wicks will melt. If you want to get all primitive, you could use cordage you made from natural fibers. I used what I had on hand.

Fuel – I used the last of a bottle of olive oil in the pantry that had gone rancid. As Rachel Ray says, EVO. The benefit of this oil is that its odorless and burns without smoking. Also, if it’s spilled while lit, it won’t cause a flash fire like other lantern fuels.

Tools

Sharp object (I used a utility knife and Swiss Army Knife)

Nail punch (Just because I had mine handy and my wick was about a 1/4 inch in diameter. I guess I could have used the SAK for the whole project.)

Assembly

Step 1: Gently make a hole in the lid of the tin with your sharp object. Be careful not to gash a huge hole in the lid or you hand. Don’t press the knife straight into the lid. Use a gentle twisting motion with the point of the knife to start the hole. This allows you to control the size you create. The hole size is determined by the diameter of your wick material. The larger the wick, the larger the flame. I tweaked the hole until the wick fits snugly. In the first photo, I included two other possible wick choices.

Create starter hole…carefully

Step 2: I used a nail punch that is cone-shaped to slowly tweak the starter hole to match my wick’s diameter.

Tweaking the hole for the diameter of my wick

Step 3: Make a small hole to the side of the main hole. This allows for air circulation and venting.

Vent hole

Step 4: Now, insert the wick into the hole with a small amount exposed on the outside of the lid. The remaining wick is curled into the bottom of the tin.

Wick inserted

Step 5: Add your olive oil. Don’t fill the tin to the top. You’ll discover a leak where the lid is connected to the side of the tin.

Fuel up!

Step 6: After adding the fuel, allow the wick a couple of minutes to saturate. Then light your lamp and impress the misses.

Burn baby, burn!

Keep Doing the Stuff,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +, and our Facebook page… and over at the Doing the Stuff Network on PinterestGoogle +, and Facebook.

P.P.S – If you find value in our blog, Dirt Road Girl and I would appreciate your vote on Top Prepper Sites! You can vote daily by clicking here or on the image below. Check out all the other value-adding sites while you’re there…

Thanks for Sharing the Stuff!

Copyright: Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you are interested a third-party article, please contact the author directly for republishing information.

Categories: DIY Preparedness Projects, Frugal Preps, Preparedness | Tags: , , , , | 46 Comments

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