Doing the Stuff Network

Join the Doing The Stuff Network and trade theory for ACTION!

 

Doing The Stuff Network

A person values whatever he acts to gain or keep.

Knowledge may weigh nothing, but until you act logically, knowledge alone won’t matter in the crucible of life. The laws of nature require all living things to act to sustain life.

You get the picture we’re painting. Doing the Stuff takes ACTION. The act of doing is the antidote for wishing you were more prepared.

We’re building a network of regular people (like your and me) to share our skills, progress, challenges, epic fails, and victories on our preparedness journey together. This community is not a tribe of theorists. 

We are trading theory for action!

Interested?

Who can join?

To be completely upfront and honest, this community is not open to everyone.

Here’s the only prerequisite to joining the DTS Network …

No spectators allowed!

If you’ve been a spectator on the sidelines and are ready to get some skin in the game, you’re welcome to join. Already busy doing the stuff? You’re welcome too. Anyone willing to take a series of self-generated, individualized, deliberate actions to decrease dependency and grow self-sufficiency can join.

What can you expect by joining?

By joining the DTS Network, you’re committing to learn a minimum of one new skill in 2014.

Really!? Only one new skill… in a year!?

Yep!

Don’t write us off as under-achievers just yet. People are busy. But one more skill makes you one step closer on our climb.

Here’s the catch to learning only one skill…

Warning: Doing the stuff is an addictive gateway drug with side effects of preparedness and self-reliance. Once you’ve learned that new skill, you’ll want to learn another one.

We welcome only those willing to commit to doing the stuff to learn “one” new skill in 2014! That includes young doers of the stuff. There’s no age limit. Get your kids involved and make this a family, group, or home school project. Along our journey, we’ll help each other carry the heavy stuff, celebrate successes, analyze failures, and make adjustments – without lame, self-appointed ex-pert attitudes!

How do you join the journey?

We’ll keep it Sherpa simple! Find the tab called the “Doing the Stuff” located at the top of our site. Click to open the page and leave a comment letting your fellow DTS Networkers know you’re joining the journey.

Sharing the Stuff

To share the stuff you’re doing, which is one purpose of the DTS Network, we encourage you to use the “Doing the Stuff” page comment section and/or your favorite social media site(s). Be sure to use the hashtag #DoingTheStuff to make it easy for others to connect with you.

Here are 3 dedicated social media pages we created for you to share and connect with your fellow DTS Networkers:

  • Pinterest – We’ve created a group board called “Doing the Stuff Network” for you to Pin your projects. It’ll be our DTS family refrigerator for all our “fridge worthy” self-sufficiency skills we’re working on.🙂 If you’re on Pinterest and would like to Pin the Stuff on this board, you’ll need an invite to Pin your Stuff. Message me with your Pinterest user name and I’ll invite you to the group.
  • Facebook – You can join our closed FB group, “Doing the Stuff Network“, and post updates on your journey. If you’d like, you can share on your personal FB page as well.
  • Google + – Same as the above groups. You can join the “Doing the Stuff Network” community by requesting an invite.
  • Twitter – There’s no Doing the Stuff Network account on Twitter. Simply use the #DoingTheStuff hashtag on your projects, questions, or discussions.

How do you know what stuff to start doing?

There are certain skills that we all need to pursue for a self-sufficient lifestyle. These categories are broad. Taking action to gain or improve your skills in a sustainable fashion will help to preserve your life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. Don’t forget to have fun in the process!

Here are a few skills to consider learning on our journey together. Don’t see the stuff you’re doing? Let us know and we’ll update our list. This is a work in progress.

Doing the Stuff Network Skills

Health and Fitness

  • Nutrition
  • Functional fitness
  • Natural cleaners/sanitation
  • Natural health

Food Independence

  • Permaculture
  • Organic GMO-free gardening; in limited space or on the back forty
  • Home-brew; distilling spirits, wine, and beer
  • Preserving and storing food; dehydrating, curing, fermentation, smoking, etc.
  • Butchering
  • Real food recipes and preparation

Alternative Energy

  • Solar
  • Hydro
  • Wood gasification
  • Bio fuels

Security and Self-defense

  • Firearms
  • Archery
  • Hardening homes and retreats
  • Reloading ammo
  • Situational awareness
  • Building tribe and community
  • Rescue, evacuation, and escape
  • Retreat plan
  • OpSec (Operational Security)

First Aid/Medical

  • Herbal and home remedies
  • Basic first aid
  • Suturing skills
  • Prevention

Education

  • Homeschool/unschool/interest-led learning
  • Science
  • Math
  • Trade skills
  • Technology
  • HAM radio and communications
  • History
  • Spiritual
  • Learning through play

Liberty

  • Free market
  • Austrian economics
  • Home/self-employment business
  • Alternative news
  • Barter
  • Investments

DiY and Handicrafts

  • Sewing/knitting
  • Candle making
  • Soap making
  • Leather work
  • Basket making
  • Weaving
  • Crochet
  • Broom making
  • Wood carving

Survival

  • Fire making
  • Shelter
  • Wildcrafting/foraging
  • Land navigation
  • Wilderness survival
  • Hunting, fishing, trapping
  • Urban survival

Homesteading/Raising Animals

  • Animal husbandry
  • Large animals
  • Fowl
  • Beekeeping
  • Farm/herd dogs
  • Frugal living
  • Preserving food
524 Comments

524 thoughts on “Doing the Stuff Network

  1. Lori

    Ready to get my backbone!

    Like

  2. Karen Folsom

    My husband and I are newbies and are sponges to learn whatever is available to us ! Trying to “do it all” at once is a bit overwhelming..now we are working on one project at a time ! Thanks for sharing what you have learned and experiences !

    Like

  3. Amanda W.

    I’d like to join the FB group, and I’ve just started following the Pinterest page. I’m currently doing a lot of stuff now….learning about natural remedies, gardening, canning, storing food and water, and I’m sure more that I can’t think of. This sounds like a group to get even more info from! Count me in. (though, my internet bandwidth is minimal, so posting pictures or posts about what I’ve done will be nill. I can share in other ways I’m sure.

    Like

  4. Mark

    I love the Skills List! It has reminded me of things I’ve started, completed, have yet to try. I realize that it could be a site maintenance nightmare, but will you have pages devoted separately to each Skill? With this page as the “jumping off” point, it would be an easier way to check on each other and perhaps learn.
    I’m in! (Just have to choose a Skill now!)

    Like

    • Mark

      I would like to suggest another “section”. OpSec. You touched on it in your article from last Tuesday, “Sorry, Bob”.
      Oh, and in posts or discussions, how about a “standard”, like the #DoingTheStuff hashtag, for each Skill? #Nutrition, #Butchering, etc.

      Like

  5. Mamalisa

    I’m afraid I’ve been one of those “list makers” which has given me a false sense of security. Knowing about something is a far different thing from knowing how to it. I’m ready to put my knowledge into action. Where are the work gloves?🙂

    Like

  6. I would like to be a part of the Doing the Stuff Network. I have been a part of winning teams all my life and this sounds like it will be a winner.

    Like

    • We’re in this together, Brad. Thanks for joining us!

      Like

      • Tractorgirl

        So now what do we do…..we have joined this group now do we give ideas ….or what is our roll in this idea,

        Like

      • Welcome to the network, Tractorgirl! Most of the sharing of ideas and stuff we’re doing happens on social media sites like FB but the comment section of the blog is always fair game to share stuff too. We’d love to hear what your doing and learn from your experience!

        Let me know if we can help. If you’re on Facebook, the link to our DTS Network group is: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DoingTheStuffNetwork/

        Like

  7. Joseph

    I’m on board for google+ if you will take me.
    Im going to try for ■Land navigation
    Got a book on it and need to learn it this year.

    Like

  8. I’m in!

    Excited to start Doing The Stuff!

    Like

  9. X Walker

    I’d like to join. I added a request to join the Facebook group but I’m not active on Facebook. I am more active on Pinterest and am following on Pinterest.

    Like

  10. X Walker

    oops forgot to add…Pinterest name is xwalker

    Like

  11. I would love to join and be on the list! What a great idea!!!

    Like

  12. Sounds like a really cool deal !🙂

    Like

  13. Donna Walker

    Sounds awesome, I kinda started this idea for myself last year when I decided to learn how to raise and care for chickens. I would love to join like minded people so count me in.

    Like

  14. margie morawiec

    So much to learn in2014! Starting with homemade remedies, cleaning products, etc. Purchased my first handgun…lots to learn there. And working on ham radio skills! Plus always honing “food”skills: canning, dehydrating, storage. Gonna be a busy year!

    Like

    • Sounds like you’re busy doing the stuff, Margie! Good to hear. Share the stuff your doing to help us all learn as we go. Thanks for joining us!

      Like

      • margie morawiec

        Time for a 6 month report…lots of canning and dehydrating going on! Gathering, reading, and studying about herbal remedies and essential oils. Making lots of potions and cleaning products at home. Hitting the bull’s eye with my new hand gun, working on long guns next. And getting rid of a lot of excess stuff that is just lying around taking up needed space…extra room and extra money…a win-win!

        Like

  15. I’m in if you’ll let me be! I’ve learned a lot of things between last year and this year already so I’m itching to keep on going🙂 I’m following the Pinterest board and would like to be in the FB group also.

    Like

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  17. Lisa

    I would like to join the Pinterest board. My user name is mamalisa83. Looking forward to learning how to use and make natural remedies. And I’m finally gonna take that awesome medical prep class by patriot nurse.

    Like

  18. I’m learning about Permaculture right now and I’ll be implementing some on the homestead this year!

    Like

  19. Love it. Count me in.

    Like

  20. MI Patriot

    I would like join the DTS club. I am on your FB page and I am on Pintrest. i do not do Google+ My pintrest name is Chris J (z1queenie). I am MI patriot on this site. I started to hone my canning skills this season.

    Like

  21. ChiRock

    I want in please!!! Living in a major city, I haven’t had much of an opportunity to learn/use survival or first aid skills. But that’s changing in 2014. Thanks!

    Like

  22. RV

    I started today by making my own batch of sauerkraut! My project/skill for 2014 is going to be a home herb garden so I can make my own herbal remedies. Thanks for the great resources and motivation Sherpa.

    Like

  23. Kathy Anderson

    Hi! I’d like to join! I am gardening, canning and preserving..just started last year.. But I’m VERY interested in permaculture.. I have been preparing for emergencies for about 20 years, but have just gotten really into it in the last couple of years!

    Like

  24. Angel B

    DH and I have already committed to ourselves to doing more, learning more. Not just by reading, but by rolling up our sleeves and trying things out. It’s great to find this bunch!

    Like

    • We’re a motley crew busy doing the stuff, Angel. Welcome to the DTS Network!

      It’s the little, consistent steps that move us forward. Starting is always the hardest part. Glad you’re joining us!

      Like

  25. Tim P

    I would like to be a part of the Doing the Stuff Network.

    Like

  26. Jeff Hampton

    I would be like to be a part of the Doing the Stuff Network. I am working on some of the skills in the list, am proficient at quite a few skills on the list, and am anxious to learn more of these skills. I will be happy to share any, or all of my experiences, knowledge, successes and failures.

    Like

  27. I would love to join. I am new to this but learning so much every day. I hunt, garden and just started trapping last season. Right now I am learning how to tan hides and (hopefully) make mittens and mukluks.

    Like

    • Shannon, welcome and thanks for joining us! Are you attempting brain tanning yet? That’s one skill I want to learn. I hunt and fish but never officially trapped. Looking forward to hearing more from you on all your skills!😀

      Like

  28. I would like to join. I have been working on canning and preserving. Also working on getting a flock of chickens going. About to start culling roosters for the 1st time – should be interesting. Pinterest name is blackbryant33.

    Like

    • Welcome to the crew, Lisa! Just sent you an invite for the Pinterest board. Looking forward to seeing all your projects and skills you’re learning!

      Have a great weekend!

      Like

  29. a lot of this stuff we did growing up … yes, out in the sticks lol but as i haven’t used it in years, i know i’ve forgotten some things so here’s to brushing up on old skills and learning new ones.

    Like

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  31. Linda Smith

    I would like to join. Please add me to pinterest and facebook.
    Thanks so much

    Like

  32. Cindy Green

    I would love to join and follow on pinterest and already do on facebook. Cindy Green

    Like

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  35. Definitely happy to be a part of this… Fantastic idea Todd… Blessings

    Like

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  39. I would love to be a part of this community. I am always trying to learn new things, teach others and share knowledge. I hope to be a beneficial part of this forum.

    Like

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  42. beautifuldrms

    Hi all,
    I am interested in joining the Pinterest group. My Pinterest name is JMpins12. As far as skills are concerned… I learned to make & can homemade, organic applesauce 2 years ago, learned veggie canning last year and just last week canned my first meat. (BTW, Canning could be added to the Preserving Food list), I’m on my 2nd year having a raised garden, and I’m learning about Foraging through books and friends and will be taking a class this fall to get some hands on experience. My ventures after that will be Healing with Herbs and Essential Oils and Suturing. Whew! I’m tired just thinking about it. LOL
    Please allow me to join your Pinterest group. I’m hoping I can add something but I know I will learn even more.
    Thanks! JM

    Like

  43. Sam

    I’m in.

    Like

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  60. Donna

    I’m a late starter but I’m teachable : )
    I’m newly divorced, 61 yr old female who believes we’re about to be in real trouble. I’ll learn from ur site & am excited to get started. Are there others like me out there that can band together to get things done faster & more efficiently? If so where would I go or talk with to get involved?? Thank u : )

    Like

    • beautifuldrms

      Hello to 61 yo newly divorced woman,
      Where are you located? If you are in WA state (my vicinity) I would love to get together so we can help each other learn new skills and prep away! I’m a 52 yo, married female looking for preppers in my area.
      JM

      Like

  61. I’m so stoked I found this! I just happen to be starting everything over FRESH, and I plan on doing it right this time😉 There is so much I want to learn, from organic gardening to building a small cabin. Finally got some land and tools, I’m ready to go! I am already addicted to DIY – everything, and my goal is to be as self sufficient as I can possibly be. I try not to focus too much on all the “bad” stuff that’s happening, while at the same time staying informed. It is a bit hard to keep that balance sometimes – I know we’re in trouble, but “doing the stuff” is a huge help for me to stay positive.

    Like

    • We’re stoked you found us LLL and took the first step(s) in your journey to self-reliance! Looking forward to hearing about your progress. There’s an active group just like yourself here and on our Doing the Stuff Network who share open learning stuff I think you’d like.

      As always, keep Doing the Stuff in your fresh start!!

      Like

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  63. beautifuldrms

    Hello to 61 yo newly divorced woman,
    Where are you located? If you are in WA state (my vicinity) I would love to get together so we can help each other learn new skills and prep away! I’m a 52 yo, married female looking for preppers in my area.
    JM

    Like

  64. Donna

    Wish I were that far north. But I’m in Central Texas : )

    Like

  65. Donna

    How can I connect with a similar group here in Texas??

    Like

  66. beautifuldrms

    Donna,
    Try using the words “Texas” (or your city) and “Prep” or “Prepper” to search the web. It should get you to some websites in your area. Or you can try Americanpreppersnetwork dot com That site should have links to prepping groups in your area. Best of luck!

    Like

  67. Donna

    This is great news. Thanks ever do much : )

    Like

  68. Donna

    Super good. Thanks : )

    Like

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  71. Tim Priebe

    I am interested in joining.

    Like

    • Right on, Tim! We’d love to have you start Doing the Stuff with us. You can let us know here in the comments the skill(s) you’re working on. If you’re on Facebook or the other social media sites listed, jump in there and start share the stuff.

      FB is the most active of all the sites with your fellow DTS Networkers. Feel free to join us there or any other way you choose.

      Thanks for connecting with us on our journey to build self-reliance! Looking forward to getting to know you and learning from you.

      Let me know if you have any questions.

      Keep Doing the Stuff,

      Todd

      Like

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  75. Sarah

    A bit late to the party, but better late than never. For my 2014 skill I’m leaning toward learning how to do laundry off grid. Hoping to learn from others, and maybe pass on what I learn.

    I just joined the Facebook group.

    Like

  76. Donna

    Is FB the best way to hear what “stuff” there is to hear?? Or is regular email working for everyone?? I’m curious.
    Thanks : )

    Like

    • Hey Donna, the FB group is pretty active in sharing the stuff. I’m thinking of starting a newsletter for the DTS Network to keep everyone informed.

      Like

  77. Donna

    Thank u. I’m new to this & way behind in prepping. I would appreciate anything I can learn.

    Like

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  96. Donna

    DTS crew?? Who is that & how do I get in touch with them??

    Like

    • Hi Donna, the folks in our DTS network are people from all over that are doing the stuff of self-reliance. We’ve got a very active group on Facebook if you use that social site. You’re welcome to join us there. We also have folks that contribute to this site via comments and occasional guest posts.

      Hope this answers your question.

      Like

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  98. beautifuldrms

    Hi all,
    Sherpa, I love your Pingbacks! I found a few things I really I didn’t know I was looking for but really needed.
    I recently learned how to regrow / start growing slips for sweet potatoes. Had a cpl tries go bad but think I have it down now. I’ll let you all know if I get much from them. I also learned to “root” cuttings from peach, apple and hazelnut trees. They may not bare fruit for awhile but who knows, they could help me or my family later in life.
    Thanks for all the great posts in DTS on Pinterest. Kudos

    Like

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  104. stephanie

    I would like to join and follow on FB. Awesome list! Looking forward to learning more stuff

    Like

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  118. Rhvonda

    Really informative site

    Like

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  122. Martha

    Found out about this site through a fb post that a friend shared with me. Excited to be part of the group!

    Like

    • Glad to have you, Martha! Tell your friend thanks for Sharing the Stuff!

      Make yourself at home and get involved with the other folks doing the stuff! Let us know if we can help with anything specific.

      Todd

      Like

  123. C Young

    I am interested in going the group. I am committed to learning one new skill in a year. The fire bricks are a great place for me to start. Just need to find a proper drill bit/stabbing object.

    Like

    • Welcome, C! The key is to start. This is a great project to get you feet wet… literally. Keep us posted and let us know how we can help!

      Todd

      Like

  124. Great idea, great site. Been Doing The Stuff for a few years, started with chickens have added pigs and are on the process of building a goat barn. I am a fibre artist by trade so have a life time of making stuff experience. Looking forward to adding to my knowledge and seeing what others are doing!

    Like

    • Happy to have you join us, Susan! You’re work is fantastic.

      Question: What kind of plant could I use for dye in leather work? Just getting into this skill and want to toy with natural dyes. Thanks, Todd

      Like

  125. JM

    Regarding natural dyes;
    Beets are great for red dye, strawberries (strawberrys will not come out of any cloth but produces a duller red color, walnuts for brown, black berries for reddish, purple & possibly cattail pollen for yellow. Good luck!

    Like

  126. I’d like to join. I’ve been Doing the Stuff for years and love your site. You always have the best ideas and information. I am an avid gardener, seamstress and general Jill of all trades…trying to master at least a few of them! I would love to follow on Facebook and Pinterest.

    Like

  127. I have only worked a little with leather. I have had success with onion skins. The challenge with leather and natural dyes is in the heating
    Leather doesn’t like to be cooked. Staining with the dye work much better. If you email me I could send along a few resources to get you started🙂

    Like

  128. For sure many of those things will produce color, but some, like beet a considered fugitive
    The will produce color initially, but will fade over time. Most berry dyes are also considered fugitive. Most people wouldn’t be concerned with that and are happy to enjoy the lovely hues as long as they last. As I am creating artwork, I need the color to be strong and fast for many years. Not sure what the intention is for your leather work, but it is something to keep in mind.

    Like

    • I make stuff for bushcraft mostly. Made some journals from pre-died leather. Just looking for ideas in case I’m not able to buy dye one day. Thanks for all your help!

      Like

  129. beautifuldrms

    Susan, thanks for the tip on “fugitive” colors. I will keep that in mind. I’d love to know of some truly permanent natural colors.

    Like

  130. barb

    I’ve spent my entire adult life dreaming of this. It is way past time for action. My skill goal for 2014 is rush weaving. The timing is perfect for harvesting rushes, so here I go! A tip for your paper fire logs: if you can get sawdust, try adding some to your paper mix.

    Like

  131. Pingback: 10 Skills That Urban Survivalists Should Learn | Ready Nutrition

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  138. Paul Henderson

    I’m up for the challenge.

    Like

  139. Pingback: Why Being a “Tree Hugger” Builds Self-Reliance | Patriot Powered News

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  143. margie morawiec

    I am concerned that if i depend too much on online resources for info — and there are some valuable and oh-so-useful sites — that one day i will be caught with my proverbial web down and not be able to access any of it. So, i have been slowly collecting, printing, and copying the info that i feel will be the most useful to myself and my husband in a longterm power down situation. I am also trying to fatten my library of books, pamphlets, etc, but with limited resources this gets expensive, even with used books. I would love any suggestions for the most comprehensive books available. Anyone have some titles to recommend? Your input will be most appreciated! Keepin’at it!!

    Like

    • Margie, I too collect hard copies of good info on self-reliance. I made several notebooks (tabbed) for easy access. Tess Pennington’s Prepper’s Blueprint is a great one to have for around $20 bucks. Also, The Encyclopedia of Country Living is another one I’d recommend. John McCann’s book in this post is also rich with projects.

      Hope this helps.

      Like

  144. margie morawiec

    Thanks for the suggestions…i will seek them out…and thanks for this great service that you and so many like you provide. Keepin’at it!!

    Like

  145. I`d like to take part too!

    Like

  146. Pingback: Grease the Groove for SHTF | Survival Sherpa

  147. Tina Long

    Have my chickens and the coop. Starting a big aquaponics walipini next year most likely but hopefully this fall. In the end would like to have a self sufficent farm. Ideas on this site could help. My next project this year is i hope to build an aluminium can heater for my shop. If it works hope to add one to the chicken coop and the geese house.

    Like

  148. RonandMariann

    Fantastic information! We are beginners with a hydroponics greenhouse system, pygmy goats and guinea hogs and chickens. Our self sufficient journey is in motion and I really hope to share our experience with anyone who needs the support!

    Like

  149. I’ve been making homemade laundry detergent and teaching others how to make it. I’ve also been learning about foraging and using plants as medicinals. One of my favorites is Plantain. I got stung by a bee the other day (by accident, I leaned on a board and it was there saying HEY GET OFF OF ME) otherwise I wouldn’t have gotten stung, but I felt the sting start in my arm and thought Plantain, ran over to the area in my yard where I saw some growing, picked a leaf, chewed it up and placed it on the sting, In a matter of minutes the sting subsided and the next day there was no swelling at the site of the sting and only a tiny red dot. I’ve always heard of Plantain as being Natures Bandaid, now I believe it.

    Like

    • Hi Sharon, and welcome to the DTS Network! Well on your way on the journey to self-reliance.

      Plantain is the bomb. I use it all the time. Making a plantain salve this afternoon when I get home from school. Should have the recipe up soon.

      Keep Doing the Stuff, my friend!

      Like

  150. beautifuldrms

    Margie,
    I too have been printing tons of info off the net and putting it in binders. However there are 4 books you should own in addition to those recommended by our favorite Sherpa. Once the SHTF; food, water and medical care will be critical. Foraging may save your life. Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide will allow you to identify ANY plant flowering plant in Northeastern and North-central N America, though I am using it very successfully in the PNW. Once identified, Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast by Pojar & MacKinnon has a color pix for each plant & gives detailed info on each including whether it is edible or medicinal. Medicinal Plants of the Pacific West by Michael Moore gives you the medical use of each plant including how to make tinctures, salves etc from them. There are 3 highly recommended books on edible plants describing which parts are edible, when to harvest etc. Unfortunately, I’ll have to get back to you on their names.
    Finally, the must have, consummate medical book is The Survival Medicine Handbook by Joseph Alton MD. & Amy Alton ARNP.
    Some of these can be found used online. Others you may have to buy new but I guarantee they’ll be worth it.
    I do hope this helps. Keep Doing the Stuff! JM

    Like

  151. Pingback: Plans Fail → Skills Endure | Survival Sherpa

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  158. Just started my journey with building the sawbuck. Skill for the year (and the kids are joining in) fire starting. Starting with ferro rods. I have spent years prepping in my head, it is now time for action.

    Like

    • Great hearing you’re starting the journey, brother! The kids will love fire craft.

      Keep doing the stuff, Nicholas!

      P.S. Join us on the Doing the Stuff Network on FB if you like.

      Like

  159. Pingback: Ability Is A Poor Prepper’s Wealth | Survival Sherpa

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  164. Fogwoman

    I live in the mountains of NW idaho. I forage, fish and hunt, make medicines, get 4-6 cords of winter firewood out of the forest, and spend most of my time out in the woods. Not bad for a 66 year old woman. But I need to learn some additional skills to keep me safe and able to continue this lifestyle.

    Like

  165. Kenny

    I would like to join Doing the Stuff Network to learn with and teach my children skills they may need in the future.

    Like

    • Kenny, done. You’re in brother! If you’re on facebook, go to Doing the STuff network and we’ll add you there too. Keep us posted on the skills you’re working on and let us know if we can help.

      Like

  166. OMG, this is like a breath of fresh air for me. My husband and I just finished our own DIY Green House using cattle panels and landscape boards. It looks amazing. I love doing stuff and tend to have too many projects going on. This will help BALANCE my life. We are retired and travel from Colorado where we live … and to Mississippi where we also live. I have so much going on in Mississippi with the gardening and greenhouse and want to build a root cellar now and rocket stove. … In Colorado I NEED SOMETHING TO DO! We live in view of Pikes Peak and I am there right now. I AM SO BORED! This will be a life saver to join and get involved. I am so blessed to have come across this page. https://www.facebook.com/uWISHuDID Blessings to you my friend.❤

    Like

  167. Stacey Jo

    Super pumped to start doing the stuff!!

    Like

  168. My wife has a dehydrator into which wet log would fit. Any negatives about drying log this way? Dehydrator goes up to 180 degrees. Would drying create a stink, or is there any chance the dehydrator, (just a plastic box, really) would get damaged? Thanks.

    Like

  169. Pingback: How to Make Firebricks (logs) and Wood Stove Logs for Free! | Ready Nutrition

  170. Pingback: How to Make Firebricks (logs) and Wood Stove Logs for Free! | Survivalist Basics | Be Prepared For Anything!

  171. Its late, but I can still do this. Skill 1: Archery. i lucked into a compound bow, and i’m practicing. If i can get the materials together to build a water purifier, water purification is my next skill. or, knowing how to build them.

    Like

  172. I’ve learned a few things over the years but since I lost my husband last Dec. I’m more worried about my future. The cancer wiped us out so I’m starting from scratch. A resource for tips and moral support? Please count me in. I’m on FB and requested to join your site. Thank you.

    Like

    • First off, sorry to hear about your loss! My wife has stage 4 cancer but, thankfully, she’s beating the disease. It’s been almost 3 years now.

      We welcome you to our group, network and family, Linda! Lots of knowledgable folks here willing to share what they’re doing as we learn from each other. Just added you to the FB group.

      Thanks for joining the journey… let us know how we can help.

      Like

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  179. RIDON

    I am willing and able to get busy

    Like

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  182. Michael Buchanan

    I would like to join the network and look forward to the first project!

    Like

    • Welcome to the Network, Michael! Feel free to share your projects here or on our social media sites. Make yourself at home. We’re a learning community.

      Keep Doing the Stuff,
      Todd

      Like

  183. Garland

    Lets Do It!

    Like

  184. mike ainsworth

    It’s need to know information, and i want to learn.

    Like

  185. Tanya

    l love to learn skills and try them out. being a busy teacher and mealworm farmer leaves little time, but hay who says a busy person has no time

    Like

  186. jozetta griffith

    this is a very interesting site. living by myself these things would be handy. love the site i would like to be a part of this

    Like

    • Every step we take towards decreasing dependency through skills only builds independence and self-reliance. Our most active group is on Facebook. If you’re on FB, get involved there. Thanks for joining us!

      Like

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  188. this is great.. how do I join? saved the site…

    Like

    • Hi John, we have groups on social media sites that share the stuff we’re doing. Check the links at the bottom of each post in the P.S. area. Feel free to contact me through email or via comments here about the stuff you’re doing or skills you’re working towards owning. Welcome aboard!

      Like

  189. Kirsten Grant

    I can’t wait to learn some new skills. My kids and I go bush on school holidays whenever we can, and we’re actively trying to homestead in the suburbs!

    Like

  190. Andrew

    I have a lot to learn…

    Like

  191. Pingback: 10 Skills that Urban Preppers should Learn | Apartment Prepper

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  193. Draven

    Hey man i’m in. been doing and leaning about two to three a year for the last five. I even have my two kids interested and learning too. i’m on pinterest but that’s it. great site by the way. keep it up.

    Like

    • Awesome, Draven! Welcome to the network. We’ve got a board on Pinterest if you didn’t know called Doing the Stuff Network.

      Thanks for joining us, brother!!

      Like

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  195. William Davis

    Want to join the Doing The Stuff stuff. Me and my wife recently started making our own laundry soap, I’m trying to get a small forge set up, (brake drum forge is already made, anvil from an old I-beam, just need coal and a blower and steel to whack on). Idk know what else is required, but pet me know. Oh, and I’m trying to improve my bow drill skills.

    Like

    • No prior self-reliance skills required to join, William. Sounds like you’ve already been doing the stuff. Awesome! And welcome to our group, brother!

      Like

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  204. Paco

    i would like to join the doing stuff network! I just signed up for a welding class and im studying to get my HAM radio license

    Like

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  215. Draven

    hey guys not sure where ta post this but here go’s. We had a boil water situation and water shortage here. I took the opportunity to experiment a bit. the result was pretty good. what did I do? hehehe I made charcoal from stale bread. it works real well in the standard emergency filter designs you can find all over the net. cleaned the water nice and if I’m thinking right the pourus charcoal would catch some of those badies we don’t need. still boil it to be sure but just thought I’d pass this along.

    Like

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  228. Hi I have been “Doing the Stuff” for many years and would love to be part of this network! I will find you on FB and Pinterest as well.

    Like

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  231. Nola

    My goal this year is to get rid of GMO, Antibiotic infused, etc. foods. Since the first of the year I have given myself a crash course in what this stuff is and why it isn’t as good as the stuff I remember from my childhood (60 years ago).

    I have always stocked up and put up my own (when I could) and grown my own, but it has become apparent that the more junk that is added to our food the more expensive it gets and the worse it is for us. When you cannot pronounce the ingredients on the label, or need a dictionary to define what it is, you probably should not be eating it.

    The really sad thing is that you have to be more than careful even buying fresh produce & meat.

    I was stunned to learn that green beans are full of pesticides and even the fresh ones should be kept away from. You should grow your own, from heritage seeds (being sure to go to a reputable seed company) and using natural methods of weed and bug control.

    As far as meat is concerned, I learned that it is almost impossible to find beef that has not been contaminated by antibiotics since it is used in their feed. And in this country it has been going on for decades and affects generations of animals.

    Just food for thought.

    Like

    • Real food is hard to come by these days, Nola. Glad to hear you’re aware of the challenges. The best way we’ve found to find good stuff to eat is either grow your own or buy locally from folks you know who raise organically or naturally grown or pasture/grass fed animals.

      Thanks for commenting and keep doing the stuff!

      Like

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  257. Katharine

    Hi, I’ve been dabbling in trying to do too many different areas of the the Stuff over the past couple years and would like to Do the Stuff as a way to focus my efforts on just one aspect. To start, I’d like to learn more about fermenting different types of food. I’ve had some fun initial experiments and would like to further explore this ancient form of food preparation. I requested to join the Facebook group and am following the Stuff board on Pinterest.

    Like

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  261. Ron G

    DTS Networkers know you’re joining the journey. I am looking forward to learning new things if the SHTF. Currently I make fire logs for the fire stove. I haven’t had any success with fire logs in the open fireplace or the outside fire pits.

    Like

  262. Jennie Dewald

    I’m currently doing the stuff in an apartment right now, adding skills as I can…My goal is for me and my family to be 100% self sufficient by 2020. I’d love to be a part of this group!

    Like

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  273. I’ve done a wide variety of “stuff” over the years. Grew up on a small farm and love the outdoors. Most recent new project has been brewing Water Kefir for improved digestion. I’m keen to do more foraging of edible “weeds” and to use more wild herbal medicines. I’ve had some success with low voltage wiring projects and want to do more of that too. So I would really like to join your network.

    Like

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  279. Happy to be working hard at this! I’m committed to building my preps this year!

    Like

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  284. Erik

    Cool things, Can’t wait to contribute. Thanks Erik

    Like

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  289. Chuck

    New to most of this n can’t wait to learn, especially about edibles

    Like

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  295. Dennis Rowe

    i am a prepper & amature electronics geek. Always ready to learn something new.

    Like

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  306. Already committed to raising quail next year. Plenty more on my to-do list.

    Like

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  314. Becky Cook

    I’d love to join in the fun of learning new things and the satisfaction of being prepared.

    Like

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  352. We are already doing stuff but would love to join others in the same journey of knowledge and being prepared

    Like

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  360. Pingback: Making Cheese: 2 Pounds of Gouda from 2 Gallons of Milk | Survival Sherpa

  361. Pingback: Making Cheese: 2 Pounds of Gouda from 2 Gallons of Milk | Prepper's Survival Homestead

  362. Damndiver

    Looking forward to some additional motivation to continue doing stuff. This year has a goal of adding a new skill each and every month.

    Like

  363. Pingback: The Number One Knife Skill for Wilderness Survival and Self-Reliance | Survival Sherpa

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  365. Pingback: How to Build a Carving Bench from a Log (Rope Vise Plans Included) | Survival Sherpa

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  373. Pingback: How Cherokees Used Trees of Southern Appalachia for Food, Medicine, and Craft | Prepper's Survival Homestead

  374. Rosetta Nuin Thorn

    By joining can I ask and receive answers to my questions? I would like a homestead, off grid, but with my own generated or solar power and/or biodigester to cook or maybe heat with. I would like to create permaculture and take advantage of the natural permaculture already on my property. I have a drilled well but not sure how to access that water. There is a spring that now belongs to a neighbor who has given me access, but I’m not sure how to pump the water to when I live without electricity. Will I find easy to follow advice…..I’m not much of a builder, but I want to learn. Will it be worth my effort to join?

    Like

    • While there’s no guarantees in our journey, if we want something enough, we somehow figure out a way to get the job done. Our most active group is on facebook. There are members there that may have answers or may not. The thing is though, we all support each skill being developed.

      As for your last question, not sure. You’ll have to answer that one for yourself. If you say yes, a lot of work is ahead of you. But there are rewards waiting along your journey, Rosetta. Take care and keep doing the stuff of self-reliance.

      Like

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  388. KelvinW

    hi, just sent a request to join the FB page.
    I am a Scout Leader in the UK, and am constantly looking for new challenges for both myself, and then (once I’ve practiced it a few times on my own) I try to pass on the ‘knowledge’ to my Scout Troop. love the look of your site. keep up the good work!

    Like

  389. Pingback: How to Make Lightweight Oilskin Tarps from Bed Sheets | Survival Sherpa

  390. Alisha

    Hi. I requested to be added to the FB group for “doing the stuff”. Is this still going on? Just found you this weekend.

    Like

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  415. Josh Wing

    I’m hoping this is still an active group

    Like

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  424. Very nice I’m glad I’ve found this group

    Like

  425. Derek Sweeney

    I like that you give very detailed info on your site

    Like

  426. Pingback: Indebtedness: The #1 Soft Skill Missing in the Self-Reliance Community | Survival Sherpa

  427. Deep unto herbal medicinal. Oils and fresh. do you have a link to herbal reciepes that would link up with your herbal kit list? Thank you for all your wonderful info and the time you spend. Just joined your Facebook, or rather asked to join. 🙂

    Like

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